Legal analysis (laws)

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Protecting Syrians in Turkey: A Legal Analysis

Authors Meltem Ineli-Ciger
Year 2017
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REFUGEE LAW
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1 Journal Article

ON THE MOVE "The reality of free movement for young European citizens migrating in times of crisis

Year 2015
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Abstract
The project builds on the assumption that barriers to the exercise of fundamental rights, in this case free movement, cannot be addressed unless accurately identified. When these deal with specific population groups, such as young people, this is all the more relevant. The obstacles that young people face with respect to legislation, access to finance and resources, to name but a few, are very different from other age groups. Complementing the existing knowledge through this perspective enriches the understanding of existing barriers and obstacles to free movement in a targeted way. The project adopts a unique methodology that operates on several levels and allows for the collection, analysis and synthesis of information in a way that it sheds light into aspects of free movement that have not been explored. It uses a mixed-method approach that combines: a) empirical field research through structured interviews with young people and national authorities in the participating countries b) data collection and targeted legal research in all partner countries; c) socio-legal analysis of the data collected and d) comparative analysis of the findings. Further, the project will raise awareness at national and EU level on barriers to free movement.
2 Project

Race in mainland European legal analysis: towards a European critical race theory

Authors Mathias Möschel
Year 2011
Journal Name ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 15
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3 Journal Article

Member States' social security agreements with India: Lessons for the future of a common EU approach

Authors Pauline Melin
Year 2018
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SECURITY
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4 Journal Article

Between a Rock and a Hard Place? A Legal Analysis of the Voluntary Repatriation of Guatemalan Refugees

Authors Y. Naqvi
Year 2004
Journal Name REFUGEE SURVEY QUARTERLY
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5 Journal Article

Changing Paradigms in Migration Law Research

Authors Thomas Spijkerboer
Year 2018
Book Title Migration on the Move
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6 Book Chapter

Dealing with Migrants in the Central Mediterranean Route: A Legal Analysis of Recent Bilateral Agreements Between Italy and Libya

Authors Andrea de Guttry, Francesca Capone, Emanuele Sommario
Year 2018
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Citations (WoS) 1
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7 Journal Article

International Migration Policy and Law Analysis (IMPALA)

Year 2008
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Abstract
The International Migration Policy And Law Analysis (IMPALA) Database is a cross-national, cross-institutional, cross-disciplinary project on comparative immigration policy. The pilot database version covers 10 years and 9 country cases including Australia, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States of America. It covers The focus is admission policy, although the authors include also acquisition of citizenship, which is generally understood as being part of ‘immigrant policies’, namely what happens after admission. The project classifies and measures tracks of entry associated with five migration categories: economic migration, family reunification, asylum and humanitarian migration, and student migration, as well as acquisition of citizenship. It is the product of an international collaboration between researchers from George Mason University, Harvard University, London School of Economics and Political Science, Paris School of Economics, University of Amsterdam, University of Luxembourg, and University of Sydney.
8 Data Set

Multilevel Governance and Migration: Conflicts Among Levels of Governance in the South Tyrol Case

Authors Roberta Medda-Windischer, Andrea Carlà
Book Title International Migrations and Local Governance
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9 Book Chapter

The EU-Turkey-'deal': Legal Challenges and Pitfalls

Authors Roman Lehner
Year 2019
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Citations (WoS) 2
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10 Journal Article

Deferred action and the discretionary state: migration, precarity and resistance

Authors SB Coutin, Sameer M. Ashar, Jennifer M. Chacon, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name CITIZENSHIP STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 3
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11 Journal Article

Chinese Pressure to Repatriate Asylum Seekers: An International Law Analysis

Authors Andrew Wolman
Year 2017
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REFUGEE LAW
Citations (WoS) 1
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12 Journal Article

The Unintended Legal and Policy Relevance of EU Mobility Partnerships A Comparative Implementation Analysis of Morocco and Cape Verde

Authors Fanny Tittel-Mosser
Year 2018
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF MIGRATION AND LAW
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13 Journal Article

Turning the Immigration Policy Paradox Upside Down? Populist Liberalism and Discursive Gaps in South America

Authors Diego Acosta Arcarazo, Luisa Feline Freier
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 11
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14 Journal Article

Normative Interaction and Law-Making: Regulating Migration in the Maghreb

Year 2013
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Abstract
This project explores law-making in the domain of migration in the Maghreb as a result of interaction between diverse exogenous and endogenous normative factors. It builds and tests an innovative approach to reforms undertaken since 2003 in three countries, namely Tunisia, Morocco and Mauritania, to improve the knowledge and understanding of legal development in the Maghreb. It unfolds the plurality of interactions that result in the law being reformed in these countries and the country-specificity of law-making in a field where law is being globalised. Drawing on comparative law, international law, sociology of law, human geography and political science, the project examines how recent regulations affecting migration (entry and stay in a territory, exit from the territory, citizenship and asylum) have been thought, elaborated and adopted in each of the three Maghreb countries covered by the project. It therefore goes into the details and mechanisms of law-making and leads to designing a comparative model of normative interactions in national law-making. This project provides an unprecedented analysis of legal development in the Maghreb and a valuable contribution to the understanding of normative interactions in the field of migration. Innovative from theoretical, empirical and methodological perspectives, it develops a coherent analytical framework of law-making, aimed to be replicable across policy and geographical areas. It is hosted in a research centre at Aix-Marseille University, France, which combines excellence in legal research and a unique multidisciplinary academic pool rooted in the Mediterranean. It resorts to field research in Morocco, Tunisia and Mauritania and a network of partners in these countries to benefit from local input and favour knowledge-sharing. This project provides supportive policy tools to strengthen the external dimension of EU’s immigration and asylum policy and a renewed partnership between the EU and its Southern Neighbourhood.
15 Project

Democratic Efficacy and the Varieties of Populism in Europe

Year 2018
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Abstract
DEMOS is built on the assumption that populism is symptomatic of a disconnect between how democratic polities operate and how citizens perceive their own aspirations, needs and identities within the political system. As such, DEMOS explores the practical value of ’democratic efficacy’ as the condition of political engagement needed to address the challenge of populism. The concept combines attitudinal features (political efficacy), political skills, knowledge, and democratic opportunity structures. In order to better understand populism DEMOS addresses its hitherto under-researched aspects at micro-, meso-, and macro-levels: its socio-psychological roots, social actors’ responses to the populist challenge, and populism’s effects on governance. DEMOS focuses not only on the polity, but equally on citizens’ perspectives: how they are affected by, and how they react to, populism. Politically underrepresented groups and those targeted by populist politics are a particular focus, e.g. youth, women, and migrants. As populism has varying socially embedded manifestations, DEMOS aims at contextualising it through comparative analysis on the variety of populisms across Europe, including their historical, cultural, and socioeconomic roots, manifestations, and impacts. DEMOS develops indicators and predictors of populism and elaborates scenarios on the interactions of populism with social actors and institutions both at the national and the EU levels. Unifying 15 partners from 10 disciplines, DEMOS combines in-depth research on populism and democratic efficacy with action research and pilot projects in order to develop lasting tools and timely policy recommendations; project methods include experiments, deliberative polling, text mining, surveys, and legal analysis. DEMOS places strong emphasis on communication and productive interactions with a variety of stakeholders throughout the project, including policymakers, journalists, students, and the general public.
16 Project

Refugees are Migrants: Refugee Mobility, Recognition and Rights

Year 2018
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Abstract
This project begins with the basic premise that refugees are migrants: by legal definition and political conception, they have left their home countries to seek refuge. This project aims to re-assess refugee protection through a lens of mobility and migration, locating the study of refugee law in the context of the refugee regime. It examines the three key aspects of refugee law – access to protection, refugee status determination, and refugee rights – bringing them into conversation with the refugee regime’s norms and practices on responsibility-sharing and solutions. Crucially, the project takes a long and broad view of refugee protection, in order to open up new possibilities and trajectories. It also integrates a legal assessment of the role of non-state actors in refugee protection. Using the broad notion of ‘intermediary’ in the migration process, it will assess the regulatory environment on access to protection, so-called ‘secondary movement’ and onward migration. It will provide an important legal assessment of the role of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) and the duties of humanitarian actors in refugee protection. It addresses the EU, not as a singularity, but as an actor in the global regime. The project is methodologically ground-breaking. It identifies practices that determine access to and the quality of refugee protection, and how these practices have developed across jurisdictions and over time, thereby historicizing and reframing the practices in question. As well as rigorous doctrinal (‘black letter’) legal analysis, it will use go beyond doctrine, and draw on theoretical conceptions of legality to explore the particular modes of regulating mobility and migration that are now central to refugee protection. It will also develop new inter-disciplinary methods, using comparative legal, historical and political-scientific tools.
17 Project

Regulating mixed intimacies in Europe

Year 2017
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Abstract
This project is a study of the regulation of ‘mixture’(‘interracial’ sex, relationships and marriage) in Europe’s past and present. Informed by critical race and critical mixed race studies, it challenges the common assumption that Europe never had ‘anti-miscegenation’ laws comparable to those in the United States. In exploring if, when, how and why forms of regulation aiming to prevent or restrict ‘interracial mixture’ developed in Europe in certain times and places, the project delivers a vital contribution to our knowledge of the development of racial thinking in Europe. The concept of ‘mixture’ provides an eminently suitable approach to the construction of ‘race’, since ‘mixture’ confuses and destabilizes racialized categories that seem fixed and essentialized in specific times and places, such as ‘black/white’. The project consist of a historical and a contemporary part. The historical part looks at the regulation of ‘mixture’ in four European countries: France, Italy, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom, in their African colonies, and wartime Europe. The contemporary part explores whether and how, in spite of norms of formal equality and colour-blindness, ‘race’ and ‘monoracial family norms’ still play a part in European law and the lived experiences of ‘interracial’ couples with law in their everyday lives. Through archival research, legal analysis and interviews with modern-day ‘mixed’ couples and families, this approach helps us understand what lawmakers and enforcers believed ‘race’ was, what they believed ‘mixture’ was, how this was translated into legal practices, and how targeted couples responded. Theoretically, the project delivers a groundbreaking contribution to the genealogy of racial thinking in Europe, especially in addressing the understudied role of law and legal scholarship in the social construction of ‘race’ and ‘mixture’ in a increasingly diverse Europe.
18 Project

Popular Sovereignty vs. the Rule of Law? Defining the Limits of Direct Democracy

Year 2018
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Abstract
Should the people be allowed to vote on the adoption of immigration restrictions that violate international law? Should it be permissible to launch a citizens’ initiative demanding the reintroduction of the death penalty? May a proposal be put to a popular vote despite the fact that voters are not properly informed about its effects? With the mushrooming of direct-democratic instruments throughout Europe and the introduction of the European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI), the relationship between popular sovereignty and the rule of law is set to become one of the defining political issues of our time. Yet despite their great practical relevance, the questions of where the legal limits of direct democracy should be drawn and how compliance with these limits should be reviewed have remained almost completely unexplored. This leaves a major gap in the research that has serious repercussions for the functionality and legitimacy of direct democracy. It is the ambitious objective of LIDD to provide the scientific basis for resolving this urgent challenge. By innovatively combining comparative legal analysis with both qualitative and quantitative methods from other social sciences, the project builds on the experience made with various direct-democratic mechanisms in order to develop general conclusions. Part 1 of LIDD distils a core of issues that is regarded as being beyond the reach of direct democracy across all European states and elaborates best practices that will help states define and apply the limits of direct democracy in a sensible way. Part 2 identifies common European minimum standards that institutional and procedural systems for reviewing compliance with these limits must satisfy and makes suggestions for improving these systems. Part 3 applies the findings from Parts 1 and 2 to the EU level; it shows how the admissibility requirements that an ECI must meet should be adapted and clarified and how the admissibility procedure could be improved.
19 Project

Brexit and Deportations: towards a comprehensive and transnational understanding of a new system targeting EU citizens

Year 2018
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Abstract
With Brexit and the abandonment of the free movement and residence principle, the UK will define its new immigration policy concerning EU nationals. The new immigration policies will aim to control and circumscribe the mobility of the citizens of the EU member states, currently free to travel, live and work in the UK. They may also be returned or deported only under very specific circumstances. Following Brexit, those who will not comply with the new regulations will become deportable. The aim of the project is to research the implementation of the new UK deportation system concerning EU nationals. The fellow will propose a comprehensive approach to the UK deportation regime, taking into account its various components: (1) immigration policies, (2) agencies that enforce them, (3) public debate that accompanies changes in migration policies and their implementation, (4) migrants that become deportable and are deported, as well as (5) return migrants and stayers back in sending countries who consider migrating to the UK and who adjust their (im)mobility strategies according to, or resisting, migration policies. The project assumes that the deportation regime is a transnational phenomenon, since it concerns not only people in migrant-receiving countries, but also in migrant-sending counties. The research offers an analysis of the largest migrant group in the UK, the Poles. The case of the Polish migrants will offer an insight into how the transnational UK deportation regime becomes rooted among migrants and develops back in their hometown communities. The project draws upon interdisciplinary qualitative methodologies, including multi-sited ethnography, Critical Discourse Analysis of media, and legal analysis. Its outcomes will reach EU, UK and Polish policy makers, influential think tanks, the academic community and the general public.
20 Project

Implications for Policy and Practice

Authors Martha J. Chinouya, Peter J. Aspinall
Book Title The African Diaspora Population in Britain
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21 Book Chapter

US Census Classifications and Arab Americans: Contestations and Definitions of Identity Markers

Authors Randa Kayyali
Year 2013
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 7
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22 Journal Article

Migration and the Transformation of German Administrative Law

Year 2015
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Abstract
"Against the backdrop of current migration flows and the by now well-established perception that Germany is a country of immigration, this research project asks how migration affects German administrative law. Being the legal realm that defines the form and content of state–citizen interactions in legal terms with the aim of enabling administrative actions while simultaneously protecting the individual from undue state interference, administrative law and its implementation in administrative practice play a crucial role in (re-)producing both the Rechtsstaat (constitutional state) and the Bürger (citizen). The theoretical starting point of this project is the relationship between the state, on the one hand, and the migrant as a legal subject shaped by administrative regulations on the other. As an empirical starting point we follow cases in which migrants appeal to specialized administrative courts in the city of Berlin to challenge administrative decisions that negatively affect their lives. Two questions are of central concern: How do migrants as individual and collective actors use and mobilize legal protections offered by administrative law when they are affected by its regulations? And how do those who apply these regulations in administrative bodies and courts face the challenges of having to take migrants into account and integrating them as legal subjects? What are the consequences of these social practices (i.e., interactions and negotiations that take place during the disputing process) for German administrative law and for the participating actors’ conceptions of the state under the rule of law? Are German administrative law and its basic ordering principle, the rule of law (Rechtsstaatlichkeit), transformed in the process and, if so, how? An interdisciplinary team of three researchers with qualifications in sociocultural anthropology, law and administrative sciences is carrying out fieldwork to answer these questions. In the first step, exploratory interviews with migrants with a range of different formal legal statuses are being conducted to identify subfields of administrative law that are of relevance in migrants’ biographies (in addition to immigration regulations, these could include, for example, laws related to education, social law or trade/business regulations). In these legal fields data are being collected by means of participant observation, interviews and the analysis of written sources in four different settings, namely, migrants’ households and organizations, lawyers and legal aid organizations, administrative bodies, and administrative courts. Data collected by the individual researchers are systematically combined and analysed in the framework of a joint database. In the later stages of the project, selected in-depth case studies will be prepared by each researcher to further illuminate various aspects of legal transformation emerging from the empirical material. ... an ethnographic study of state-migrant interactions in administrative courts The project contributes to interdisciplinary socio-legal research by bringing perspectives from the anthropology of the state, anthropology of migration and legal anthropology into a critical and reflexive dialogue with debates from doctrinal scholarship on the regulatory capacity of law in situations of state transformation. Funded by the Thyssen Foundation under the funding line ‘State, Economy and Society’, the project is a collaborative venture of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle and the Law and Society Institute at Humboldt University, Berlin."
24 Project

Conceptualising citizenship regime(s) in post-Dayton Bosnia and Herzegovina

Authors Eldar Sarajlic
Year 2012
Journal Name CITIZENSHIP STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 9
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25 Journal Article

The Complexities of Dual Citizenship Analysis

Authors Dorota Pudzianowska
Year 2017
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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26 Journal Article

"The EU Should Talk to Germany" Transnational Legal Consciousness as a Rights Claiming Tool among Undocumented Migrants

Authors Helen Schwenken
Year 2013
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Citations (WoS) 7
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27 Journal Article

Back to basics: The conditions of just refugee returns

Authors Megan Bradley
Year 2008
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 11
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28 Journal Article

A slow ride towards permanent residency: legal transitions and the working trajectories of Ukrainian migrants in Italy and Spain

Authors Francesca Alice Vianello, Claudia Finotelli, Elisa Brey
Year 2019
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
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29 Journal Article

Court decisions over marriage migration in Finland: a problem with transnational family ties

Authors Johanna Leinonen, Saara Pellander
Year 2014
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 15
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30 Journal Article

ASYFAIR: Fair and Consistent Border Controls? A Critical, Multi-methodological and Interdisciplinary Study of Asylum Adjudication in Europe

Year 2016
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Abstract
‘Consistency’ is regularly cited as a desirable attribute of border control, but it has received little critical social scientific attention. This inter-disciplinary project, at the inter-face between critical human geography, border studies and law, will scrutinise the consistency of European asylum adjudication in order to develop richer theoretical understanding of this lynchpin concept. It will move beyond the administrative legal concepts of substantive and procedural consistency by advancing a three-fold conceptualisation of consistency – as everyday practice, discursive deployment of facts and disciplinary technique. In order to generate productive intellectual tension it will also employ an explicitly antagonistic conceptualisation of the relationship between geography and law that views law as seeking to constrain and systematise lived space. The project will employ an innovative combination of methodologies that will produce unique and rich data sets including quantitative analysis, multi-sited legal ethnography, discourse analysis and interviews, and the findings are likely to be of interest both to academic communities like geographers, legal and border scholars and to policy makers and activists working in border control settings. In 2013 the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was launched to standardise the procedures of asylum determination. But as yet no sustained multi-methodological assessment of the claims of consistency inherent to the CEAS has been carried out. This project offers not only the opportunity to assess progress towards harmonisation of asylum determination processes in Europe, but will also provide a new conceptual framework with which to approach the dilemmas and risks of inconsistency in an area of law fraught with political controversy and uncertainty around the world. Most fundamentally, the project promises to debunk the myths surrounding the possibility of fair and consistent border controls in Europe and elsewhere.
31 Project

Fair and Consistent Border Controls? A Critical, Multi-methodological and Interdisciplinary Study of Asylum Adjudication in Europe

Year 2016
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Abstract
‘Consistency’ is regularly cited as a desirable attribute of border control, but it has received little critical social scientific attention. This inter-disciplinary project, at the inter-face between critical human geography, border studies and law, will scrutinise the consistency of European asylum adjudication in order to develop richer theoretical understanding of this lynchpin concept. It will move beyond the administrative legal concepts of substantive and procedural consistency by advancing a three-fold conceptualisation of consistency – as everyday practice, discursive deployment of facts and disciplinary technique. In order to generate productive intellectual tension it will also employ an explicitly antagonistic conceptualisation of the relationship between geography and law that views law as seeking to constrain and systematise lived space. The project will employ an innovative combination of methodologies that will produce unique and rich data sets including quantitative analysis, multi-sited legal ethnography, discourse analysis and interviews, and the findings are likely to be of interest both to academic communities like geographers, legal and border scholars and to policy makers and activists working in border control settings. In 2013 the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was launched to standardise the procedures of asylum determination. But as yet no sustained multi-methodological assessment of the claims of consistency inherent to the CEAS has been carried out. This project offers not only the opportunity to assess progress towards harmonisation of asylum determination processes in Europe, but will also provide a new conceptual framework with which to approach the dilemmas and risks of inconsistency in an area of law fraught with political controversy and uncertainty around the world. Most fundamentally, the project promises to debunk the myths surrounding the possibility of fair and consistent border controls in Europe and elsewhere.
32 Project

Secondary Cities of Europe: The Case of Regional Industrial Development in Turkey

Year 2012
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Abstract
This project will investigate the interaction between Turkey's accession to the European Union (EU) and industrial transformation of the EU with a focus on Turkey’s three developing cities: Denizli, Kayseri, and Gaziantep. The Customs Union Agreement of 1995 between EU and Turkey generated a massive growth in Turkey’s industrial exports. Although Denizli, Kayseri, and Gaziantep are not located within the older industrial regions of the country, they managed to surpass national growth rates within this period. Their performance signifies a regional redistribution of industries and justifies the following research question: How has the accession process since 1995 been shaping the regional distribution of manufacturing industries in Turkey? The project will focus on national, local, and enterprise-level dynamics respectively: 1) Changes in National Policymaking: This phase will be composed of interviews with government agencies and non-governmental organizations and the analysis of the legal documents and secondary data in Ankara; capital of Turkey. The aim is to illustrate the changes in industrial policymaking since 1995. 2) Local Industrial and Urban Developments: The field research in Denizli, Gaziantep, and Kayseri will focus on migration, capital movements, urban transformation, and agglomeration effects since 1995. The aim is to analyze the local interactions between accession-related policies and industrial dynamics. 3) Enterprise-Level Dynamics: Company monographs will focus on the growth strategy of selected enterprises, changes in their shop floor relations, and profile of their customers and subsidiaries. The aim is to investigate the impact of accession-related policymaking on the performance of industrial enterprises in these cities. The project findings will illustrate the actual consequences of the current industrial policymaking in Turkey at the local level and make policy suggestions for an effective EU-wide industrial and innovation strategy.
33 Project

Deprivation of Citizenship: Is There an Issue of EU Law?

Authors Jo Shaw
Book Title Debating Transformations of National Citizenship
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34 Book Chapter

Assessment and Implementation of the “Scientific Visa Package” (Researchers Directive 2005/71/EC and Recommendation 2005/761/EC)

Year 2011
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Abstract
In 2005 the European Commission adopted the "Scientific Visa" package to make scientific careers more attractive and open up the Community to third-country nationals who might be admitted for the purposes of research. The package includes Directive 2005/71/EC on a specific procedure for admitting third-country nationals for the purposes of scientific research and Recommendation 2005/761/EC aiming to facilitate the issue by the Member States of uniform short-stay visas for researchers from third countries travelling within the Community for the purpose of carrying out scientific research. This ICMPD study, commissioned by the European Commission, covers the implementation and impact of the aspects of the package covered in the Directive and the Recommendation in all 27 EU member states. This forms part of a broader study on human resource policies and practices in research, on the “Scientific Visa” package and on the implementation of pan-EU pension schemes targeted at researchers. This is to provide support for a monitoring system on national policies on human resources in research and on their effects at the level of research organisations, foreseen in the 2009 People Specific Programme of the 7th Framework Programme. This should lead to improved knowledge of policy developments and actions on human resources in the European Research Area and their effects at the level of research organisations and improve the knowledge base for future policy developments. Specific aims • to conduct a conformity analysis of the legal and administrative framework in the 27 EU Member States for implementation of the Directive and Recommendation • to analyse the institutional set-up and implementation in practice of the provisions of the two legal instruments in the 27 EU Member States • to evaluate the impact of the research residence permits and visas on the basis of both quantitative and qualitative data and research • to identify any potential difficulties in implementation and suggestions for improvement • to identify good practices in relation to the implementation of the Directive and the Recommendation Outcomes Comparative report on Directive 2005/71/EC in 27 EU Member States: • Conformity analysis of how Member States have transposed the Directive into national law • Statistical analysis illustrating the impact of the Directive in quantitative terms • Assessment of the impact of the Directive, and identification of difficulties and good practices in its implementation, through extensive national and EU-level research and questionnaires Comparative report on Recommendation 2005/761/EC in 27 EU Member States • Analysis of the national legal and/or administrative frameworks relating to the Recommendation • Account of the authorities responsible and the institutional and procedural set-up for the implementation of these provisions • Assessment of the impact of the Recommendation, and identification of difficulties and good practices in its implementation, through extensive national and EU-level research and questionnaires
35 Project

Geographies of generation: age restrictions in international adoption

Authors Jessaca B. Leinaweaver
Year 2015
Journal Name SOCIAL & CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
Citations (WoS) 1
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36 Journal Article

The crime drop in comparative perspective: the impact of the economy and imprisonment on American and European burglary rates

Authors Richard Rosenfeld, Steven Messner
Year 2009
Journal Name BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY
Citations (WoS) 49
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37 Journal Article

Discourse and Migration

Authors Teun A. van Dijk
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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38 Book Chapter

When "Inclusion" Means "Exclusion": Discourses on the Eviction and Repatriations of Roma Migrants, at National and European Union Level

Authors Dragos Ciulinaru
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
Citations (WoS) 1
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39 Journal Article

Regulating Movement of the Very Mobile: Selected Legal and Policy Aspects of Ukrainian Migration to EU Countries

Authors Monika Szulecka
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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40 Book Chapter
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