Conflict, war and violence

Conflict, war, and violence drive migration, particularly of asylum seekers, refugees, unaccompanied migrant minors, and internally displaced persons, as individuals are directly or indirectly affected by insecurity.

Studies listed under this migration driver refer to civil, ethnic, and religious conflict, war, terrorism, military intervention, human rights (violations and abuses), safety, and (in)security.

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Organized Violence, New Migration Patterns and Development: A Comparative Study in Europe and the Americas

Year 2019
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Abstract
Understanding international migration and especially forced migration is of increasing importance for development and stability at both national and global scales. Since the 1990s, the nexus of migration and development has been studied extensively. However, during the last two decades organized violence has emerged as a key factor in the relation between migration and development. In some cases, it can be clearly identified as the fueling factor for international migration processes (e.g., civil wars in Central America and the Middle East). Elsewhere for example, in transition countries it might have an extractive relation with migration (e.g., migration officials operating organized extortion against migrants and criminal networks of human trafficking). In arrival countries, organized violence appears as illicit employment networks, homegrown terrorist cells, or xenophobic aggression by political groups (e.g, in the United States and Germany). At the same time, these different articulations of violence and migration reflect development-related factors that shape their outcome. Sometimes organized violence is an outcome of lack of sustainable development or of armed conflicts over resources, political power, or socio-cultural influence; at others it is the cause of absent development or massive migration. The concept of organized violence offers a promising approach for understanding new migration patterns and development, yet one whose explanatory potential has not yet received adequate scholarly attention. As a category, it captures forms of social violence that are difficult to grasp with the conventional conceptual frameworks of organized crime, collective violence, and political violence. Given its importance for the Central and Northern American region as well as the Africa-Middle-East-Europe region, a comparative international research integrating the strengths of different regional contexts and academic communities is propitious. Therefore, this research project will compare and contrast forms of violence, focusing in particular on organized violence, and how these shape migration patterns and development. The research team consists of two institutional partners: Lateinamerika-Institut of Freie Universität Berlin and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, headed by Ludger Pries (RUB) and Stephanie Schütze (FU) as principal investigators. The two partner institutions will collaborate in this project with scholars from El Colegio de México and Universidad de Guadalajara in Mexico, Koç University and Orien-Institut Istanbul in Turkey, and the University of Illinois at Chicago in the United States.
1 Project

On silences: Salvadoran refugees then and now

Authors Leisy J. Abrego
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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2 Journal Article

On silences: Salvadoran refugees then and now

Authors Leisy J. Abrego
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 2
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3 Journal Article

Iraq's long-term impact on jihadist terrorism

Authors Daniel L. Byman, Kenneth M. Pollack
Year 2008
Journal Name ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE
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4 Journal Article

Refugee Women and (psychosocial) Volunteer Engagement

Year 2016
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Abstract
"This project is part of the research-intervention-cluster ""Shifting Solidarities?"" which is funded by the Federal Government’s Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration. The project ""reWoven"" wants to analyse processes of solidarisation of female volunteers with refugee women. By working on underlying consequences of violence experience on both sides, the aim is to develop practical interventions. Refugee women have, in many cases, made experiences of gender-specific violence – in their home countries, during their displacement, as well as in the shelters in Europe; experiences of war and political violence, genderspecific and sexualized, as well as domestic violence. Female volunteers may have also had experiences of gender-specific discrimination and violence, and therefore decided to get involved with refugee women. It is this point in the relationship between refugee women and female volunteers that the Dialogue Project wants to address. Through explorative field-work and 360° interviews on site, we want to find out: What offers do refugee women accept from volunteers, what offers are still missing? What expectations do refugee women have towards female volunteers – and vice versa? How do female volunteers deal with their own stress regarding their engagement with women who have experienced violence? What conflicts arise through this and how can these conflicts be solved inside the relationships, dialogically? The output of the research phase will be the development of supervision models and dialogue projects in refugee shelters, in which experiences of gender-specific violence and discrimination can be discussed in a safe setting. Through an open dialogue on these experiences, the women involved can transform potentially traumatizing experiences into resources, and in this way, develop possibilities of participation."
5 Project

Cities' Policies: the Work of European Cities to Counter Muslim Radicalisation

Authors Anja van Heelsum, Floris Vermeulen
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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6 Journal Article

Cities' Policies: the Work of European Cities to Counter Muslim Radicalisation

Authors Anja van Heelsum, Floris Vermeulen
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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7 Journal Article

Child migrants at the border

Authors Lourdes Torres
Year 2014
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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8 Journal Article

Investigating the interactions between civil wars and migration.

Year 2015
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Abstract
Poor countries are often plagued by civil wars. They are also, in many cases, emigration countries. Anybody interested in the development of such countries must understand to what extent these phenomena are interrelated, and how they interplay with each other. If it is pretty clear that civil wars push people to leave the country, it remains understudied how diasporas play a role in the emergence and evolution of violent conflicts. Indeed, the interactions between diasporas and conflict have roughly been overlooked by the economic literature to date, in spite of the very suggestive pieces of evidence provided by related research fields and of the very important policy questions that it raises – in particular, how to optimize the contribution of diasporas to peaceful development. Based on case studies such as those of Erytrea or of Sri Lanka, the literature in history and political science underlines diverse mechanisms through which diasporas have intervened in the evolution of violence in their home country, either as peace-builders or as peace-wreckers. On the other hand, in these case studies, the evolution of civil wars also appears to have been determinant of emigration and return migration patterns and, eventually, of the nature of diasporas’ involvement in the political situation in the homeland. This project will investigate the joint dynamics of civil conflicts and migration in developing countries. It will first build a theoretical framework to characterize how diasporas and civil wars interact together, accounting for the endogeneity of both migration and violence. The theoretical predictions derived from this framework will then be empirically tested, relying on recent and original data. Through a multi-disciplinary perspective, nourished by the findings of the qualitative research and relying on economic tools – both theoretical and empirical – this project will allow to build the first comprehensive investigation of the diasporas – conflict nexus.
9 Project

Individual Decisions to Migrate During Civil Conflict

Authors Pratikshya Bohra-Mishra, Douglas S. Massey
Year 2011
Journal Name DEMOGRAPHY
Citations (WoS) 44
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10 Journal Article

Identifying and Analyzing Causes of Violence against Women in Shan Migrant Communities According to NGO Workers and Shan Migrant Women in Chiang Mai, Thailand

Authors Jessica W. Counsell
Year 2016
Journal Name ASR CHIANG MAI UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES
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11 Journal Article

Forced urbanisation: A cross-national assessment of the effects of intranational political violence on a nation's largest cities

Authors Robert M. Anthony, KK Robison
Year 2018
Journal Name URBAN STUDIES
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12 Journal Article

Violence, Networks, and International Migration from Colombia

Authors Adriana Carolina Silva, DS Massey
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Citations (WoS) 5
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13 Journal Article

Criticism and violence. Sarrazin debate, criticism of Islam, and terrorism in the immigration society

Authors Klaus J. Bade
Year 2018
Journal Name HISTORICAL SOCIAL RESEARCH-HISTORISCHE SOZIALFORSCHUNG
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14 Journal Article

Violence, Networks, and International Migration from Colombia

Authors Adriana Carolina Silva, DS MASSEY
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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15 Journal Article

The Diffusion of Anti-Immigrant Violence in Germany, 1990-1999

Year 2007
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Abstract
"Theoretical background and objectives The project continues research on the causal dynamics behind anti-immigrant violence in Germany during the 1990s. With a total of about a hundred deaths and many thousands of acts of violence over an extended period of time, this constitutes by far the most important outbreak of ethnic violence in post-war German or indeed West European history. In combination with the availability of a uniquely detailed event data set (see below) studying this wave of violence can make important contributions to our knowledge of the causal dynamics behind mobilisation processes generally, and ethnic mobilisation and violence in particular. Earlier research (e.g., Koopmans 2004; Koopmans and Olzak 2004) has shown that the violence was spurred by political opportunities in the form of highly mediatised controversies between government and opposition over immigration control. Although this connection is well-established, it is less clear, which social mechanisms linked opportunity structures to acts of anti-immigrant violence. The current project investigates two social mechanisms: spatial diffusion processes across localities and the role of bystander publics. The data on anti-immigrant violence display strong temporal clustering and a non-random geographical distribution, suggesting that diffusion processes have played an important role. We investigate whether violent events that were widely mediatised and that occurred during periods of intense immigration debates increased rates of violence in other localities; whether local opportunity structures affected variation in rates of violence across localities; and whether diffusion was more likely to occur between socially homophilous localities. We then investigate the role of bystander publics. On several occasions (e.g., Hoyerswerda, Rostock, but also less well-known instances) local bystander crowds were present when groups of right-wing youths attacked immigrant hostels. Sometimes these crowds ""just"" watched, at other times they signalled support by applauding or cheering, or signalled opposition by verbally or physically intervening in defence of immigrants. We investigate whether such bystander public reactions – which often received much media attention – contributed to the diffusion or containment of violence and acted as an intermediate mechanism between national political opportunities and local activism. Research design, data and methodology The data are drawn from content analyses of German newspapers, supplemented with violence statistics of the Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz and Reuters news agency data gathered by Ron Francisco. The newspaper data contain detailed information (including the exact timing and geographical location) on altogether around 12,000 events, including public statements on immigration control or the extreme right, political decisions on immigration issues, repression of the extreme right, as well as 700 violent attacks against immigrants, of which for 81 a bystander public reaction was registered. Data are analysed using event history analysis (diffusion across localities) and negative binomial regression (bystander effects). Findings Diffusion processes indeed played an important role in mediating between opportunity structures and anti-immigrant acts. Widely mediatised acts of violence, as well as those that occurred during periods of heightened immigration debate were more likely to lead to copycat events in other localities. Local opportunities also played a role: violence was less likely to occur where the moderate right (CDU or CSU), and even where extreme right parties were electorally strong. This goes against the common sense idea that strong right parties fuel anti-immigrant action, but fits political opportunity structure theories that state that extra-institutional mobilisation is more likely to occur when a constituency is less well represented in institutional politics (e.g., Kriesi et al. 1995). Further, we showed that the recurrent finding from diffusion studies that geographical distance matters can be made sociologically more meaningful when one substitutes – as Gabriel Tarde suggested long ago – geographical by social distance. We investigated three aspects of social homophily: socio-economic (% of the workforce in the agrarian sector), political (% CDU/CSU votes), and demographic (% immigrants). Diffusion was significantly more likely to occur across localities that were more similar along these dimensions and once this was taken into account geographical distance did not matter anymore. Regarding reactions of bystander publics, first results indicate that they were an extremely important mechanism. In particular bystander reactions that supported anti-immigrant activists had a strongly positive impact on the subsequent rate of violence. Bystander reactions that disapproved of the violence did not have a significant effect, probably because they inadvertently generated more media attention for the violence and its perpetrators. Importantly, once bystander public reactions are taken into account, effect sizes for the political opportunity variables become weaker and in some cases insignificant, suggesting that bystander public reactions were indeed important in signalling to activists the opening or closure of opportunities for successful mobilisation."
16 Project

Migration, violence, and safety among migrant sex workers: a qualitative study in two Guatemalan communities

Authors Teresita Rocha-Jimenez, Shira Goldenberg, Kimberly C. Brouwer, ...
Year 2016
Journal Name CULTURE HEALTH & SEXUALITY
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17 Journal Article

Social Dynamics of Civil Wars

Year 2016
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Abstract
Each year, civil wars cause hundreds of thousands of deaths, millions of refugees, ecological disruptions, regional instability. These conflicts encompass many players and their effects are felt not only at the regional level but also within Western societies (refugees, terrorism, sectarian tensions). Despite this, no systematic comparison of civil wars have been conducted using a qualitative method. Social scientists are struggling to understand these breakdowns of the social order, which are fertile from a theoretical perspective because they de-trivialize the social functioning. In civil war, the partial or total institutional collapse marks the end of the (imperfect) monopoly of the state with regards to violence and justice, challenges the social and ethnic hierarchies and also provokes fluctuation of the economic and social capital. Accordingly, we will address three questions. First, the sudden and non-anticipated reconfiguration of modes of accumulation and conversion of capitals and the relationship between social fields. Next, the formation of competing institutions by politico-military movements involved in the construction of an alternative political order. Finally, individual adaptations to risks and uncertainty affecting the ability of actors to anticipate the consequences of their actions and reassess their own values and engagement. The implementation of this program of comparative sociology of civil wars will draw on extensive fieldwork. This requires an adapted methodology for researchers faced with unpredictable situations, where quantitative methods fall short. Prosopography, semi- or unstructured interviews and participant observation are therefore prioritised. The creation of an interdisciplinary team of sociologists, political scientists and anthropologists will be able to carry out research based on thick description, following 25 years of experience by the PI in collecting data and supervising researchers in areas afflicted by civi
18 Project

Exploring the Impact of Displacement and Encampment on Domestic Violence in Kakuma Refugee Camp

Authors Rebecca Horn
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 12
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19 Journal Article

Exploring the Impact of Displacement and Encampment on Domestic Violence in Kakuma Refugee Camp

Authors Rebecca Horn
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
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20 Journal Article

Violence in European schools: A widespread phenomenon that matters for educational production

Authors Andreas Ammermueller
Year 2012
Journal Name LABOUR ECONOMICS
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21 Journal Article

Violence Committed Against Migrants in Transit: Experiences on the Northern Mexican Border

Authors César Infante, Alvaro J. Idrovo, Mario S. Sánchez-Domínguez, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH
Citations (WoS) 35
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22 Journal Article

Domestic Violence in the Postmodern Society: Ethical and Forensic Aspects

Authors Bianca Hanganu, Beatrice Ioan, Dragos Crauciuc, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name POSTMODERN OPENINGS
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23 Journal Article

Critical Latinx Indigeneities: A paradigm drift

Authors Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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24 Journal Article

(Re) Moving borders: North African clandestine emigrant in the age of terror

Authors Mustapha Hamil
Year 2017
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
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25 Journal Article

The toxic tonic: Narratives of xenophobia

Authors Rosaura Sánchez
Year 2011
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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26 Journal Article

Economic Migration and Communal Violence in Pakistan

Authors Raymond Nienchen Kuo
Year 2019
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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27 Journal Article

Violence in European schools: A widespread phenomenon that matters for educational production

Authors Andreas Ammermueller
Year 2012
Journal Name LABOUR ECONOMICS
Citations (WoS) 9
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28 Journal Article

Segmented assimilation, local context and determinants of drug violence in Miami and San Diego: Does ethnicity and immigration matter?

Authors R Martinez, MT Lee, AL Nielsen
Year 2004
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 67
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29 Journal Article

Protecting the "Most Vulnerable"? The Management of a Disaster and the Making/Unmaking of Victims after the 2008 Xenophobic Violence in South Africa

Authors Lydie Cabane
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE
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30 Journal Article

Do Mexicans flee from violence? The effects of drug-related violence on migration decisions in Mexico

Authors Laura H. Atuesta, Dusan Paredes
Year 2016
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 3
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31 Journal Article

THE CENTRAL AMERICAN CHILD MIGRATION SURGE: A TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL INVESTIGATION OF ITS CAUSES

Authors Richard C. Jones
Year 2017
Journal Name LATIN AMERICANIST
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32 Journal Article

Determinants of Mexico-US Outward and Return Migration Flows: A State-Level Panel Data Analysis

Authors Isabelle Chort, Maelys de la Rupelle
Year 2016
Journal Name DEMOGRAPHY
Citations (WoS) 5
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33 Journal Article

Determinants of Mexico-US Outward and Return Migration Flows: A State-Level Panel Data Analysis

Authors Isabelle Chort, Maelys de la Rupelle
Year 2016
Journal Name DEMOGRAPHY
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34 Journal Article

Critical Latinx Indigeneities: A paradigm drift

Authors Maria Josefina Saldana-Portillo
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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35 Journal Article

Understanding refugee durable solutions by international players: Does dialogue form a missing link?

Authors Fred Bidandi
Year 2018
Journal Name COGENT SOCIAL SCIENCES
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36 Journal Article

Intimate Partner Violence and Depression Among Latin American Women in Toronto

Authors Paula Godoy-Ruiz, Kwame McKenzie, Brenda Toner, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH
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37 Journal Article

Roma migrant children in Catalonia: between the politics of benevolence and the normalization of violence

Authors Ioana Vrabiescu
Year 2017
Journal Name ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 6
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38 Journal Article

The Externalities of Civil Strife: Refugees as a Source of International Conflict

Authors Idean Salehyan
Year 2008
Journal Name AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Citations (WoS) 57
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39 Journal Article

Intimate Partner Violence and Depression Among Latin American Women in Toronto

Authors Paula Godoy-Ruiz, Kwame McKenzie, Robin Mason, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH
Citations (WoS) 3
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40 Journal Article

Social and structural factors increase inconsistent condom use by sex workers' one-time and regular clients in Northern Uganda

Authors Putu Duff, Josephine Birungi, Kate Shannon, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name AIDS CARE-PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIO-MEDICAL ASPECTS OF AIDS/HIV
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41 Journal Article

En el norte la mujer manda - Gender, generation, and geography in a Mexican transnational community

Authors Jennifer S. Hirsch
Year 1999
Journal Name AMERICAN BEHAVIORAL SCIENTIST
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42 Journal Article

"We are not ignorant": Transnational migrants' experiences of racialized securitization

Authors Megan Ybarra
Year 2019
Journal Name ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING D-SOCIETY & SPACE
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43 Journal Article

Religious Fundamentalism and Radicalization in Comparative Perspective

Year 2015
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Abstract
"Theoretical Background and objectives In the context of the combination of escalated sectarian conflicts in Iraq and Syria, and home-grown conflicts around real and perceived attacks on Islam and its symbols in the West (from Rushdie to Charlie Hebdo), increased numbers of Muslim youth in Western countries have embraced radical forms of Islam and have sometimes become actively involved in violence, both at home and abroad. Beyond impressionistic evidence on a few active radicals, extremely little is known about the incidence among countries’ Muslim populations of adherence to radical versions of Islam and support for religiously-motivated violence. To answer these questions, cross-national surveys across Muslim populations in different countries are necessary, but apart from the very descriptive surveys by the US American Pew Research Institute, which are moreover not publicly accessible for secondary analysis, no such information is available. Existing research also leaves another major question unanswered, namely to what extent religious radicalism is specific to current Islam or whether it is comparable to what we find in other contemporary religions, particularly within Christianity. This project wants to fill these voids. A first step was an analysis based on the SCIICS survey. This was the first representative survey study to compare religious fundamentalism and outgroup hostility between Muslims and Christians (Koopmans 2015), and as such it attracted worldwide media attention. While the study revealed large differences between the two religious groups even when controlled for a range of socio-economic and demographic variables, the limitation of the study to two Muslim ethnic groups as well as the fact that it compared Muslims of immigrant origin to autochthonous Christians limits the generalizability of its findings. Moreover, the SCIICS survey did not include questions about support for religiously-motivated violence and extremist religious organizations. Research design To overcome these shortcomings, we are conducting two studies: Religious Fundamentalism and Radicalization Survey and Jihadi Radicalization in Europe Database. The first project is a representative survey study of Muslims, Christians, Jews, and non-believers in 2017 in the following 8 countries: Germany, the United States, Cyprus, Turkey, Israel, Palestine, Lebanon and Kenya. The choice of countries allows for a broad range of cross-national and cross-sectional comparisons. For instance, all three of the world’s Abrahamic religions are represented in our sample, allowing us to investigate similarities and differences between these three religious groups. In addition to comparisons across religious groups, we are also interested in examining variances within the religious groups. Therefore we sampled across different branches of Islam, i.e. Sunni Muslims (Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Kenya, and Cyprus), Shia Muslims (Lebanon) and Alevites (Turkey, Cyprus); of Christianity, i.e. Catholic and Protestant Christians (Germany, and the USA), Greek Orthodox Christians (Cyprus, Lebanon), Maronite Catholics (Lebanon) and the generally more conservative Christianity of Sub-Saharan Africa (Kenya); and of Judaism, i.e. both Orthodox and Reformist branches (Israel and the USA). Our research design also allows us to investigate the role of immigration and integration experiences in religious radicalization. The study not only includes two Western immigration countries with strongly divergent immigrant integration policies (Germany and the United States), but also three countries with autochthonous Muslim and Christian populations (Kenya, Cyprus, and Lebanon). Furthermore, both in Germany and the United States, we oversample Christians of immigrant origin, thus extending the range of comparisons to a variety of immigrant and native groups and augmenting the possibility of isolating the role of immigration. Apart from the usual socio-economic and demographic control variables, the surveys included questions on religiosity, religious knowledge, fundamentalism, out-group hostility, intergroup contacts, discrimination, adherence to conspiracy theories, violence legitimation, and support for extremist groups. Moreover we employed a survey experiment to test the effect of religious scripture on religious violence legitimation. The broad range of variables and the experiment included in the surveys will enable rigorous hypotheses testing, which will help us uncover causal mechanisms behind religious fundamentalism and radicalization. In the second project Jihadi Radicalization in Europe Database, we aggregate profiles of Jihadist individuals from publicly available information. The main units of analysis of this database are people from four European countries (Germany, France, the Netherlands and the UK) who fit in any of the following characteristics: People (including their partners and children from the age of 15 who accompanying them), who have traveled to Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan or other conflict regions involving Muslims, acting out of their Islamist conviction (the so-called foreign fighters); people who have actively recruited others as foreign fighters or motivated others to join through propaganda activities; people who were involved in the aiding, planning or conducting of Islamist terrorist activity in Europe or were suspected thereof; people who supported, justified or glorified the use of violence in the name of Islam through propaganda activities; people who are members of jihadi-Salafist and Islamist organizations, which support the use of violence. The database will primarily consist of biographical and sociodemographic information on individuals, with the aim of identifying common characteristics. Using the sociodemographic data, we aim to investigate, what kind of people are more susceptible to radicalization, whereas we will use the biographic data to gain insights into contexts of radicalization. In addition to these characteristics, social contacts and networks of the individuals will also be registered, in order to analyze the social network structures. This information will be used to explore group-specific radicalization processes as well as to identify central influential figures within the networks. The relevant data will be gathered through an online and media research. A variety of sources of data will be used to collect relevant information such as newspaper articles, interviews, online-blogs, biographies, news databases such as LexisNexis®, and court proceedings, in order to gather as much data as possible on the individuals. The database can be understood as an aggregation of publicly available data on European Islamists."
44 Project

Special issue: Critical Latinx indigeneities

Authors Maylei Blackwell, Luis Urrieta, Floridalma Boj Lopez
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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45 Journal Article

RACIAL VIOLENCE AND BLACK-MIGRATION IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1910 TO 1930

Authors SE Tolnay, E. M. Beck
Year 1992
Journal Name AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 89
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46 Journal Article

Health, welfare reform, and narratives of uncertainty among Cambodian refugees

Authors G Becker, Y Beyene, P Ken
Year 2000
Journal Name CULTURE MEDICINE AND PSYCHIATRY
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47 Journal Article

'Does the Girl Think of Nothing but Food?' FOOD AS A MARKER OF UNHOMELINESS, INAUTHENTICITY AND VIOLENCE IN ZOE WICOMB'S OCTOBER

Authors Antoinette Pretorius
Year 2015
Journal Name FOOD CULTURE & SOCIETY
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48 Journal Article

The Impact of Past Conflicts and Social Disruption on the Elderly in Cambodia

Authors Zachary Zimmer, John Knodel, Kiry Sovan Kim, ...
Year 2006
Journal Name POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 8
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49 Journal Article

Special issue: Critical Latinx indigeneities

Authors Maylei Blackwell, Luis Urrieta, Floridalma Boj Lopez
Year 2017
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 4
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50 Journal Article

RACIAL VIOLENCE AND BLACK-MIGRATION IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1910 TO 1930

Authors SE Tolnay, E. M. Beck
Year 1992
Journal Name AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW
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51 Journal Article

Forced marriage: an analysis of legislation and political measures in Europe

Authors Alexia Sabbe, Marleen Temmerman, Els Leye, ...
Year 2014
Journal Name CRIME LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE
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52 Journal Article

Causality Chains in the International Migration Systems Approach

Authors Roel Jennissen
Year 2007
Journal Name POPULATION RESEARCH AND POLICY REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 29
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53 Journal Article

Conclusion: Transnationalizing Integration

Authors Ayhan Kaya
Book Title Islam, Migration and Integration
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54 Book Chapter

Crime and justice in the context of resource scarcity

Authors JP Crank
Year 2003
Journal Name CRIME LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE
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55 Journal Article

'Does the Girl Think of Nothing but Food?' FOOD AS A MARKER OF UNHOMELINESS, INAUTHENTICITY AND VIOLENCE IN ZOE WICOMB'S OCTOBER

Authors Antoinette Pretorius
Year 2015
Journal Name FOOD CULTURE & SOCIETY
Citations (WoS) 1
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56 Journal Article

governing migrant populations in france, germany and the united kingdom

Authors luke b wood
Year 2016
Journal Name EUROPEAN POLITICAL SCIENCE
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57 Journal Article

Conflict-Induced Displacement, Understanding the Causes of Flight

Authors Prakash Adhikari
Year 2013
Journal Name AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Citations (WoS) 25
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59 Journal Article

governing migrant populations in France, Germany and the United Kingdom

Authors luke b. wood
Year 2016
Journal Name EUROPEAN POLITICAL SCIENCE
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60 Journal Article

New Global Estimates of Internally Displaced Persons

Authors
Year 2016
Journal Name POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW
Citations (WoS) 1
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61 Journal Article

Human trafficking and health: A conceptual model to inform policy, intervention and research

Authors Cathy Zimmerman, Charlotte Watts, Mazeda Hossain
Year 2011
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
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62 Journal Article

Colonial resource capture: triggers of ethnic conflicts in the Northern Frontier District of Kenya, 1903-1930s

Authors Gufu Oba
Year 2011
Journal Name JOURNAL OF EASTERN AFRICAN STUDIES
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63 Journal Article

Terrorists Repudiate Their Own Citizenship

Authors Christian Joppke
Book Title Debating Transformations of National Citizenship
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64 Book Chapter

FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LIKELIHOOD OF FURTHER MOVEMENT AMONG MOBILE FEMALE SEX WORKERS IN INDIA: A MULTINOMIAL LOGIT APPROACH

Authors Dipak Suryawanshi, Niranjan Saggurti, Varun Sharma, ...
Year 2016
Journal Name JOURNAL OF BIOSOCIAL SCIENCE
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65 Journal Article

Xenophobic Violence in South Africa and the Nigerians' Victimization: An Empirical Analysis

Authors Muritala Dauda, Rauf Tunde Sakariyau, Abdullateef Ameen
Year 2018
Journal Name PERTANIKA JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HUMANITIES
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66 Journal Article

Individual and contextual determinants of victimisation in Brazilian urban centres: A multilevel approach

Authors Klebson Moura, Raul Silveira Neto
Year 2016
Journal Name URBAN STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 3
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67 Journal Article

Media construction of migration in Mediterranean Sea: non-citizenship in Spanish press?

Authors Rocío Fajardo Fernández, Rosa M. Soriano Miras
Year 2016
Journal Name Revista Internacional de Estudios Migratorios
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68 Journal Article

Human Smuggling Under Risk: Evidence from the Mediterranean

Authors Kara Ross Camarena, Sarah Claudy, Jijun Wang, ...
Year 2019
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Abstract
Since 2007, the number of refugees fleeing conflict and violence has doubled to about 25 million. Mass migration has destabilized the European Union, lead to broad changes in national immigration policies, and triggered the resurgence of far right, xenophobic political parties. Yet little is known about how illicit human smuggling institutions may be driving migration and the subsequent political changes. We leverage granular data on migrant flows across the Mediterranean, coupled with information about sea routes, riots at port cities, and wave conditions, to conduct two studies. We find substantial evidence that migrant flows respond to political and environmental risks as well as a government-led counter-smuggling intervention. These findings clarify drivers of migration and suggest actions that can be taken to mitigate human smuggling.
69 Report

Sexual politics, torture, and secular time

Authors Judith Butler
Year 2008
Journal Name BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY
Citations (WoS) 208
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70 Journal Article

Responses to intimate partner violence in Kakuma refugee camp: Refugee interactions with agency systems

Authors Rebecca Horn
Year 2010
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
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71 Journal Article

The dismantling of our future

Authors Suzanne Oboler
Year 2010
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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72 Journal Article

Jason Hart, Years of Conflict: Adolescence, Political Violence and Displacement (Studies in Forced Migration)

Authors Tanya Narozhna
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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73 Journal Article

Undocumented bodies, burned identities: refugees, sans papiers, harraga - when things fall apart

Authors Roberto Beneduce
Year 2008
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION SUR LES SCIENCES SOCIALES
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74 Journal Article

Trends in international migration in Latin America and the Caribbean

Authors A Pellegrino
Year 2000
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNAL
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75 Journal Article

Miseducating Latina researchers: Challenges and consequences in the field

Authors Isabel Martinez
Year 2016
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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76 Journal Article

Understanding Undocumented Migration from Honduras

Authors Jose Alejandro Quijada, Jose David Sierra
Year 2019
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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77 Journal Article

The Majority-Minority Divide in Attitudes toward Internal Migration: Evidence from Mumbai

Authors Nikhar Gaikwad, Gareth Nellis
Year 2017
Journal Name AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Citations (WoS) 5
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78 Journal Article

Anger Regulation in Traumatized Cambodian Refugees: The Perspectives of Buddhist Monks

Authors Angela Nickerson, David E. Hinton
Year 2011
Journal Name CULTURE MEDICINE AND PSYCHIATRY
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80 Journal Article

Miseducating Latina researchers: Challenges and consequences in the field

Authors Isabel Martinez
Year 2016
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
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81 Journal Article

Leaving Mogadishu: Towards a Sociology of Conflict-Related Mobility

Authors Anna Lindley
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 27
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82 Journal Article

Leaving Mogadishu: Towards a Sociology of Conflict-Related Mobility

Authors Anna Lindley
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
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83 Journal Article

Masculinity and undocumented labor migration: injured latino day laborers in San Francisco

Authors Nils G. Walter, P Bourgois, HM Loinaz
Year 2004
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
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84 Journal Article

Urban Refugees: The Experiences of Syrians in Istanbul

Authors Auveen Woods
Year 2016
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Abstract
In over six years of escalating violence, more than 200,000 Syrians have been killed, and millions more have been forced to flee their homes both within the country and to neighboring states. The repercussions of this ongoing violence have reached Europe, with refugee numbers set to reach 1 million in Germany alone.1 In a desperate bid to stem the flow of people, the EU and Turkey reached a deal in November 2015 to reduce the number of migrants entering Europe from Turkish territory. UNHCR’s Regional Refugee Response estimates that Turkey now hosts 2.1 million registered Syrians refugees.2 This number easily reaches 2.3 million when unregistered Syrians are included. Contrary to the popular image, the majority of Syrians, like other refugee groups, are found outside camps in urban areas. Through interviews with a sample of Turkish NGOs and Syrian people of different religious, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds in Istanbul, this report highlights the daily challenges and insecurity faced by Syrians in urban areas that are not only leading many to leave for Europe but also directly influencing refugees’ choices in how they exit the country. While the Turkish state has spent over 7.6 billion USD on refugees, the overwhelming majority of this goes towards the 25 refugee camps in the country. There is no state support for urban refugees in Turkey outside those near the camps. Inconsistency also exists in the posi-tion, knowledge, and response of the various municipal governments in Istanbul regarding Syrian populations. In consultation with the Istanbul governor’s office and the relevant national agencies, Istanbul’s local munici-palities are responsible for and oversee a number of services in their vicinity from infrastructure and maintenance to health, religious, and water services. Knowledge of the number and needs of the populations in their districts is a necessity for municipal develop-ment in order to plan for emergencies, capacities, and services. In this context, the paradox posed by Syrians in urban areas is that they are a development and legis-lative challenge and not a humanitarian problem. 1T. Porter, “Refugee crisis: Germany has received over 1 million migrants in 2015,” International Business Times, December 10, 2015. Retrieved http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/refugee-crisis-germany-has-received-over-1-mil-lion-migrants-2015-1532674 2Syrian Regional Refugee Response: Inter-agency Information Sharing Portal, United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees, November 2015, accessed November 30, 2015, http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/re-gional.php.All interviewees for this report highlighted a number of problems and issues with living in Turkey. In the case of one family interviewed, these were identified as push factors that eventually led them to travel to Europe. A lack of documentation such as residence or work permits and the accompanying rights entailed exclude Syrians from simple practices such as opening a bank account, ensuring restitution for their work, legally renting, and in many cases paying their utilities. This creates a fundamental insecurity and instability in the lives of Syrians that prevents them from settling in Turkey. Bureaucratic problems in harmonization and commu-nication result in rules and laws being inadequately announced and inconsistently applied from place to place. These problems range from inconsistency in the application of mobility restrictions on Syrians to knowledge of their rights. Despite legal entitlements and efforts by the Turkish state to enroll Syrian children into schools, there has been limited success outside the camps. In urban areas, there have been reports of some schools rejecting Syrian children due to discrimination, a lack of capacity, or ignorance of the law.3 Similarly, there is inconsistency in the application and acceptance of Syrians by health workers. Inter-viewees have also complained of the speed in which rules governing Syrians in Turkey change and of not being able to find information on this. This inconsist-ency and a lack of transparency in the implementation of laws and regulations governing Syrians make their situation insecure and untenable.
85 Report

Borders and badges: Arizona’s children confront detention and deportation through art

Authors Silvia Rodriguez Vega, Silvia Rodriguez Vega
Year 2018
Journal Name LATINO STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 1
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86 Journal Article

Just war theory and the 2003 Iraq war forced displacement

Authors Benjamin R. Banta
Year 2008
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 5
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87 Journal Article

Just war theory and the 2003 Iraq war forced displacement

Authors Benjamin R. Banta
Year 2008
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
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88 Journal Article

Religious Extremism and Radicalisation from a Migration and Integration Theory Perspective

Year 2017
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Abstract
"Short Description The aim of the project ""RADIKAL"" is to further the understanding of the relation between migration, religion and radicalisation. Central to this aim is the analysis of the relationships between migration-experiences, acculturation-processes, (perceived) experiences of discrimination and the formation of (extremist) political and religious convictions and attitudes. The project?s focus thereby is on radicalised Muslim youths. Based on established theories and data, models regarding the causal relations between the mentioned core concepts are drawn. A mixed methods design serves as the basis for the models? analysis. This approach allows for the identification of empirically well-grounded models, which may serve as an evidence-based principle for prevention and intervention. Cooperation Partner Institute for Interdisciplinary Conflict and Violence Research (IKG),Bielefeld University; Department ""Migration, Integration, Transnationalization"" (MIT), Berlin Social Science Center (WZB)"
89 Project

DACA and the Surge in Unaccompanied Minors at the US-Mexico Border

Authors C Amuedo-Dorantes, Thitima Puttitanun
Year 2016
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Citations (WoS) 2
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90 Journal Article

AFRICAN AMERICANS' SEARCH FOR "MORE FOR LESS" AND "PEACE OF MIND" ON THE EXURBAN FRONTIER

Authors Deirdre Pfeiffer
Year 2012
Journal Name URBAN GEOGRAPHY
Citations (WoS) 11
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91 Journal Article

Gangs, Migration, and Crime: The Changing Landscape in Europe and the USA

Authors Scott H. Decker, Frank van Gemert, David C. Pyrooz
Year 2009
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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92 Journal Article

The Return of Banishment: Do the New Denationalisation Policies Weaken Citizenship?

Authors Audrey Macklin
Book Title Debating Transformations of National Citizenship
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93 Book Chapter

Does Internal Migration Make Difference? An In-depth Study to Explore the Change in Socio-economic Status and Gender Relations between Internal Migrant Families

Authors Sadia Jabeen, Muhammad Wajid Tahir, Jam Ghulam Murtaza Sahito
Year 2017
Journal Name FWU JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
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94 Journal Article

DACA and the Surge in Unaccompanied Minors at the US-Mexico Border

Authors C Amuedo-Dorantes, Thitima Puttitanun
Year 2016
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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95 Journal Article

Note from the editor

Authors ANGELIQUE HAUGERUD
Year 2014
Journal Name American Ethnologist
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96 Journal Article

Looking beyond the state: transitional justice and the Kurdish issue in Turkey

Authors Joost Jongerden
Year 2018
Journal Name ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 1
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97 Journal Article

Coming Out Under the Gun: Exploring the Psychological Dimensions of Seeking Refugee Status for LGBT Claimants in Canada

Authors Sarilee Kahn, Edward J. Alessi
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF REFUGEE STUDIES
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98 Journal Article

Introduction. The Immigration-Crime Connection: Competing Theoretical Perspectives

Authors Scot Wortley
Year 2009
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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99 Journal Article

The long-term impact of employment bans on the economic integration of refugees

Authors
Year 2018
Journal Name SCIENCE ADVANCES
Citations (WoS) 3
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100 Journal Article
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