Research
database

This constantly growing database accumulates and structures
relevant knowledge in the field of migration.

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Forced Displacement and Refugee-Host Community Solidarity

Principal investigator Ulrike Kluge (Principal Investigator)
Description
"In light of the multiple challenges arising from the recent refugee migration to Europe, evidence-based solutions and policies to facilitate a successful integration process has become more pressing than ever. Departing from an understanding of integration as a dynamic two-way process that is not inherently confined to refugees, but extends to actively involve host communities, FOCUS aims to deepen the understanding of key dynamic refugee- and host-community relations, concentrating in particular on the socio-psychological and socio-economic dimensions of these relations. By bridging socio-economic and socio-psychological research and creating synergies between both disciplines in the field of forced migration, FOCUS attempts to develop a comprehensive set of composite indicators that reflect a more nuanced understanding of integration. In order to pursue this endeavor, multi-site research will be conducted with refugees from Syria and host communities in Croatia, Germany, Jordan and Sweden. These countries have been selected to ensure that insights and lessons are derived from varying experiences with forced displacement and local integration. The field research will entail a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods needed to generate a deeper understanding of the barriers, facilitators and solutions for integration from the perspective of refugees and host communities. This in turn should contribute to the development of a stronger evidence base for the impact of tools and programs tailored to foster integration. FOCUS is an EU-Horizon 2020 project, which started in January 2019 and includes partners from eight countries (Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Jordan, Sweden). In Berlin, the project is being implemented in cooperation between the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the Charité Campus Mitte and the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research at Humboldt University."
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33201 Project

Irregular maritime migrations: islands in the network of routes

Authors El Observatorio de la Inmigración de Tenerife (OBITen)
Description
The Canary Islands are part of the irregular maritime routes for African emigration to the European mainland. The small size of the islands, in geographic, demographic and economic terms, poses a unique challenge to managing the arrival of migrants, specifically if we consider the relative unpredictability of the phenomenon. This makes it necessary to consider certain key elements in order to understand how irregular maritime migrations toward the Canary Islands have evolved in the past decade.
Year 2019
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33202 Report

Women, Forced Migration – and Peace? Peacebuilding practices of women in refugee camps

Principal investigator Ulrike Krause (Principal Investigator)
Year 2019
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33203 Project

Controlling immigration? How regulations affect migration flows

Authors Marc Helpling, David Leblang
Year 2019
Journal Name European Journal of Political Research
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33204 Journal Article

Migration Governance and Asylum Crises

Principal investigator Lennart Olsson (), Mine Islar (), Anne Jerneck ()
Description
In our part of the project (Work package 6) will investigate the responses given to migration at different scales. It aims to provide an in-depth understanding of responses provided by actors ranging from urban to rural contexts, from transnational city-city collaborations to local community initiatives. Local scale is one of the first spaces where migration needs to be governed. Cities different than governments include networks of public and private sector leaders and institutions that include citizen initiatives, trade unions, private companies and universities, among others. A multi-scalar approach will be implemented by examining three different types of cases (1) The case of urban-rural development in Sweden, via international migration, (2) The case of local migration ecosystems in Northern Italy, (3) The case of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, (4) The case of transnational collaborations and social innovations. By engaging in multi-scalar case studies, the aim is to cover both official and unofficial responses to the so called “refugee crisis”, emphasizing the role of the local authorities in facilitating (or hindering) the application of national policies on reception, redistribution and inclusion/exclusion of newcomers as well as the increasing role of communities and innovations in shaping the migration response by also showing opportunities. These areas, with the potential benefits of interdisciplinary research, will seek synergies between the following two goals; SDG Goal 9 on building resilient infrastructure as well as Goal 11 on inclusive cities. By doing so, we will inform policy making in these areas and potentially contribute to the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Year 2019
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33205 Project

Three Years on: An Evaluation of the EU-Turkey Refugee Deal

Authors Seçil Paçacı Elitok
Year 2019
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33206 Policy Brief

Children Hybrid Integration: Learning Dialogue as a way of Upgrading Policies of Participation

Description
CHILD-UP researches the social conditions of migrant children’s integration through social participation, taking in primary account gender differences, legal status and age groups. , with the final aim to propose an innovative approach to understand and transform their social condition. First specific objective is providing an European overview, collection of data and evaluation concerning children’s conditions of living, protection and education. In selected contexts in seven countries, the research focuses on: (1) policies and practices of integration in schools, reception centres, social services and communities; (2) children’s and parents’ experiences, perceptions and expectations of integration; (3) specific practices of language teaching, facilitation of dialogue, intercultural education and mediation. Second objective is providing support for migrant children’s exercise of agency in changing their own conditions of integration and constructing hybrid identities. This objective can be achieved through the promotion of a dialogic system of practices, in schools and in their relations with partners (social services, reception centres, education and mediation agencies) and families. The project provides: (1) guidelines for dialogic activities in schools; (2) written and online training packages for teachers and other professionals; (3) a package for self-evaluation of activities. These tools will support co-action of teachers and other professionals, and coordinated planning between schools and their partners. Third objective is informing policies at the local, national and European level through dissemination and exploitation of research outcomes and tools. This objective can be achieved through the collaboration of three consortium partners, international and local stakeholder committees, and the implementation of an online portal containing a web platform conceived as a moderated wiki space and a digital archive hosting research materials and tools.
Year 2019
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33208 Project

Migrating heritage? Recreating ancestral and new homeland heritage in the practices of immigrant minorities

Authors Karolina Nikielska-Sekula
Year 2019
Journal Name International Journal of Heritage Studies
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33209 Journal Article

Biblioteca digital sobre migraciones e interculturalidad

Authors Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33210 Data Set

‘I Want to Stay Here Forever’: Narratives of Resistance amongst Polish-born Adolescents in the UK

Authors Sara Young
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33211 Journal Article

Mobile Urbanity. Somali Presence in Urban East Africa

Authors Neil Carrier, Tabea Scharrer
Year 2019
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33212 Book

Advancing Alternative Migration Governance

Principal investigator dr. Anja van Heelsum (Project Coordinator (PI)), See our website ()
Description
ADMIGOV aims to promote an alternative migration governance model. ADMIGOV takes seriously the principles laid out in the New York Declaration (NYD) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to study how alternative approaches to migration governance can be better designed and put into practice. However, rather than proposing a top-down study of existing migration policies, ADMIGOV studies the reality of existing polices and practices on the ground to improve migration governance in line with the principles set out in the NYD and SDGs. This is the unique analytical feature of ADMIGOV. We bring together analyses of migration governance in practice and in key times and spaces and relate these analyses to the key structuring principles of migration governance as laid out in the NYD and SDGs. This is done to better understand the current gaps between principles and practices and in order to provide insights and recommendations for migration governance in the future. ADMIGOV is methodologically unique. We bring analyses from along the migration ‘chain’, from entry through to exit and incorporating key issues such as labour migration, protection needs and development goals. ADMIGOV has chosen several case studies of key times and spaces in migration governance, including the Greek islands, Lebanon, and Turkey, to better understand the most important and most problematic processes at play. Additionally, through the involvement of the Danish Refugee Council, ADMIGOV has access to possibly the largest dataset on migrants on the move today. The 4Mi data of the Danish Refugee Council will give ADMIGOV access to and help us generate more data than a single research team could normally collect. In short, ADMIGOV is designed to combine the analyses of existing policies and practices on the ground in key times and spaces with the wide- ranging 4Mi data to generate new indicators of good migration governance, helping the EU put the NYD and SDGs into practice.
Year 2019
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33213 Project

European Management of Migration and Refugees - Consequences for mobility and political stability in transit countries

Principal investigator Natascha Zaun (Project Leader)
Description
The project runs from 2019-2021 and is jointly conducted by the Fafo Research Foundation, NUPI (both Oslo), the University of Oxford, the Institut Français du Proche Orient (Amman) and LSE. It analyses the challenges resulting from the disparities in sharing the burden and responsibility for forced migrants worldwide and how states have responded to these challenges.
Year 2019
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33214 Project

Refugee migration and civil society solidarity in the welfare state

Principal investigator Dietmar Süß (Principal Investigator ), Cornelius Torp (Principal Investigator )
Year 2019
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33215 Project

Transnational life of Polish Roma - migrations, family and ethnic borders in the changing European Union

Principal investigator Michal P. Garapich (Principal Investigator)
Year 2019
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33216 Project

ICMPD Migration Outlook 2019 - Origins, key events and priorities for Europe

Authors International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD)
Year 2019
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33217 Policy Brief

Integration of Refugee Students in European Higher Education Comparative Country Cases

Authors Ayselin Gözde Yıldız, Dilaver Arıkan Açar, Elif Çetin, ...
Description
According to UNHCR, an estimated 68.5 million individuals are today forcibly displaced worldwide. Around half of the world’s refugees are children and young people under the age of 35. While many students are forced to abandone their studies in their home countries, only one percent of refugee youth is able to access and continue higher education. Evidence shows that despite a fundamental right to education, refugees and similar at-risk populations encounter significant challenges barring access to higher education. The situation also prevails in Europe. When confronted with dramatic increases of mass migration in 2015 and 2016, European countries did little to adjust access to higher education for refugees. With very few exceptions, there are still no specific national policy approaches among European countries. Higher education institutions are mostly left to their own practices to handle the issue. Emergency responses generally focus on providing limited numbers of competitive scholarships, linguistic support, and counseling services. However, large-scale, sustainable broad-based internationalization policies and frameworks are utterly lacking. While effective response to refugees’ higher education needs is a responsibility for all higher education institutions, rather than taking the lead to push for inclusive societies, universities have curbed their activities within the restricted legislative frameworks that create status-related obstacles for refugees. Accordingly, this report provides an overview and descriptive analysis of how selected countries (Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Norway, UK and Turkey) have responded to the massive inflow of refugees, as well as the policy practices they have developed concerning refugee students’ integration into higher education. Seeking to encourage sustainable policy responses and national frameworks, this report highlights these selected countries’ procedures to ensure access to higher education and also approaches to recognize foreign qualifications. It also examines particular challenges in the case of each country. The report limits its scope exclusively to refugee students, excluding practices developed for refugee academics/university staff. This report offers a contribution to the existing literature on educational policy for refugees and encourages higher education institutions to remember their central role as a driving force for social development and integration.
Year 2019
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33218 Report

Migrating heritage? Recreating ancestral and new homeland heritage in the practices of immigrant minorities

Authors Karolina Nikielska-Sekula
Year 2019
Journal Name International Journal of Heritage Studies
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33219 Journal Article

Longitudinal aspects of the interaction between health and integration of refugees in Germany

Principal investigator Hannes Kröger (Principal Investigator ), Jürgen Schuppe (Principal Investigator )
Description
The project “Longitudinal Aspects of the Interaction between Health and Integration of Refugees in Germany” (LARGE) is developing a set of indicators of refugees’ physical and mental health based on data from the IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees. Researchers in the project are also studying what role these indicators play over time in refugees’ integration into German society. LARGE is a subproject of the DFG research unit “Refugee Migration to Germany: A Magnifying Glass for Broader Public Health Challenges” (PH-LENS).
Year 2019
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33220 Project

Who is reshaping public opinion on the EU’s migration policies?

Authors Thomas Huddleston, Hind Sharif, Migration Policy Group (MPG)
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33221 Policy Brief

Biographies of migrants from Syria and West Africa in Brazil and in Germany – processes of inclusion and participation in the context of so-called irregular migration

Principal investigator Gabriele Rosenthal (Principal Investigator ), Hermílio Santos (Principal Investigator )
Description
"How does the life of migrants from West Africa and Syria in Germany differ from that of such migrants in Brazil? To what extent is their situation influenced by their own collective history and biography, and to what extent by the fact that Brazil is a country that defines itself in terms of immigration, in contrast to Germany, which defines itself as being rather opposed to immigration? Do immigrants in Brazil experience relations with different groupings of established citizens differently from immigrants in Germany? To answer these questions, we will reconstruct the collective and biographical histories of people from West Africa and Syria who have been living in Germany or in Brazil for a number of years. Our main focus will be on those migrants who are generally labelled as “irregular” or “unplanned” in the dominant social discourses, and on how processes of inclusion and participation differ in Brazil and Germany. Our intention is to analyse how people settle in very different lifeworlds and in different official and social contexts. We will need to take into account that the process of migrating to Brazil was probably less difficult than the process of migrating to Europe, and that obtaining permission to reside and work is easier for immigrants in Brazil than it is in Europe. Indeed, many migrants who manage to enter the European Union are described as “illegal”, while people who overstay their visas are illegalized and their residence status may remain unclear for a long time. A central aim of the planned study is to conduct empirical research into these differences and their consequences for the migrants concerned. We will ask which social and biographical constellations before, during and after migration determine biographical courses that make it easier or more difficult for migrants to become established and participate in the social life of the destination country. By comparing different groupings of migrants, different migration courses, and different present situations, we plan to show to what extent the present life of the migrants is determined by: a) their collective and biographical courses in the destination country, b) their migration processes, c) their new lifeworlds, and, especially, d) opportunities for inclusion and participation in the destination country. In addition to biographical case reconstructions based on biographical-narrative interviews (some of which were conducted in the context of earlier projects with migrants who had recently crossed the border), we plan to study biographical courses over a long period with follow-up interviews and group discussions on the present life of the migrants."
Year 2019
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33222 Project

How Age Makes a Difference: Practices of Classification, Belonging and Political Subjectivity Among Young Refugees in Germany

Principal investigator Katharina Schramm (Principal Investigator)
Description
What constitutes and characterizes minority or legal majority among refugees? How does age make a difference in terms of rights (of residence), politics and affects? These are the two main questions we pursue in this project. Time and again there are intense public debates on the age of refugees and on forensic age assessment practices that rely on x-rays of collarbones or the examination of the genitals of the young people, among other things. Indeed, unaccompanied minor refugees have different rights and opportunities than adult refugees: they have the right to a place in an apartment for young people, to a German language course and to schooling. At the same time, they need to adhere to the guidelines of pedagogic caretakers and legal guardians. Most of all, they have different opportunities than adult refugees when it comes to organizing their residence in Germany. For example, it is legally almost impossible to deport unaccompanied minors. In our project, we focus on two research dimensions: 1) Classification practices, i.e. the enactment and manifestation of age as a category of difference in practices of age assessment; 2) The effects and consequences of these classifications, i.e. age-specific forms of belonging, rights, possibilities and restraints of young refugees with the status "unaccompanied minor". In order to pursue our research questions, we plan a long-term ethnographic study. Here, we will conduct participatory observations at all important stations of the arrival process of young refugees and conduct interviews with the central actors of the different procedures. These include the reception and youth welfare services, pedagogic and forensic practices of age assessment as well as objection proceedings tied to them. Eventually, asylum hearings at the federal office for migration and refugees will also be taken into account. What is basic for the above described research dimensions is our understanding of the category of age as contingent, situated and dependent on specific enactment practices. In this way, we can analyze which elements become (ir)relevant and decisive in manifold medical, pedagogic and bureaucratic practices, when it comes to the question: is a refugee a minor? In order to study the effects of these classifications we work with the concept of political subjectivity which allows us to include rights and claim making as well as affective forms of belonging in our investigation.By means of this first ethnographic analysis of the enactment and effectiveness of age in the context of migration this project also develops new approaches for a critical intervention in the dominant public discourse on the practice and meaning of age assessments in young refugees. Our project makes a theoretical and empirical contribution at the intersection of medical anthropology, science and technology studies (STS), studies on refugees and migration as well as research on childhood and youth.
Year 2019
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33223 Project

Returning Children Migrants – Main Challenges in School Environment

Authors Paulina Szydłowska, Joanna Durlik, Halina Grzymała-Moszczyńska
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33224 Journal Article

The role of tourism in multicultural societies

Principal investigator Sayaka Osanami Törngren (Project Leader), Thomas Pederson (Participant), Caroline Adolfsson (Participant), Pieter Bevelander (Participant)
Description
Tourism and the tourism industry have been criticized for contributing to a uni-dimensional view of culture and people, which (re)produces stereotypic images, discredited histories and romantic fantasies. There is a risk that tourism reduces places to monocultures where the complexity that makes them interesting disappear. No modern society has only a culture, language or identity. Globalization, migration and other intercultural exchanges changes places. Inclusion and participation are increasingly highlighted in tourism and place branding literature. However, tourism and place branding have rarely been associated with concepts such as integration, migration and multiculturalism. TiM's objective is to explore the role of tourism in multicultural societies, in Sweden and beyond, as well as to act for the inclusion and representation of diversity in tourism development and place branding. TiMS’ originality lies in 1. A multidisciplinary and innovative approach to tourism studies, including design, social work, migration studies, marketing and interaction design, placing it in the forefront of technical and methodological development. 2. The ability to reach actual practical and societal change through collaboration between research and practice through action-oriented research. 3. Studies in Sweden and four non-European countries (Kenya, C hina, Japan and the US) broadens and deepens the understanding and conceptualisation of sustainable and inclusive forms of tourism and place branding.
Year 2019
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33225 Project

Migration and Modernity: Historical and Cultural Challenges

Description
Today’s world sees masses on the move: across the globe, there are almost one billion international and internal migrants; in the EU alone, there are 57 million residents living outside their country of birth, amounting to over 11% of the EU28 population. This unprecedented global situation requires serious political action. Yet this action will only be effective once the historical, cultural and social roots of migration are properly understood. It is this understanding that the ITN MOVES will provide. The project’s chief objective is to undertake a comparative study of the social and cultural roots of mass mobility, and provide the urgently needed historical analysis that can address the so-called migration crisis of the present through an understanding of the population movements of the past. The network has been set up as an interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers in the Humanities and the Social Sciences who will approach migration as both a condition of modernity and one of its greatest challenges, placing the systematic confrontation of past and present forms of migration at the centre of their activities. Through its innovative training programme, carried out in conjunction with 18 non-academic partners (including NGOs, charities, and the cultural and creative industries), MOVES will enable a new generation of experts gain the historical knowledge required to respond to future migration crises with innovative solutions. The project will generate new knowledge about the shaping of the modern world and provide conceptual tools to avoid short-termism in migration management through its emphasis on enduring cultural patterns, historical context, and migration flows over the long term. The links between contemporary and historical migration that MOVES research will uncover can be used to improve educational provision, inform future policy, and counter the rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across the EU.
Year 2019
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33227 Project

Migrant and Refugee Rights Index for the Middle East and North Africa

Description
As of 2000 the stock of migrants in the Global South has been growing at a faster rate than in the Global North, and as of 2016 countries in the Global South host eighty-four per cent of the world’s refugees. Yet the majority of academic literature on migration examines movement from the Global South to the Global North, and there is significantly less theorization about how host countries in the Global South treat migrants and refugees. My project addresses this gap through an examination of host state policies toward and treatment of migrants and refugees in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a region that has seen increasing patterns of migrant and refugee settlement in the last three decades. My project will develop an index that rigorously measures host state policies toward migrants and refugees using a minority rights framework. The results of this study will provide MENA host states, European donor states, and international humanitarian organizations with a useful index tool for highlighting areas in which legal and social measures should be strengthened via targeted funding and capacity-building to counteract exclusion and provide stronger protection for migrants and refugees. This project directly corresponds to the Horizon 2020 policy priority of creating inclusive, innovative and reflective societies through the promotion of coherent and effective cooperation with third countries, and by addressing issues of identities, tolerance and cultural heritage. Completing this research as a postdoctoral scholar at the Institute for Minority Rights at EURAC will equip me with skills in the use of a multi and interdisciplinary approach combining legal, political and sociological research in order to address the complex issue of minority and migrant rights for this project and going forward as a scholar. In particular, I will gain exposure to the Institute’s use of theoretical frameworks for developing indicators that measure minority rights protection.
Year 2019
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33228 Project

Snapshots from the Borders - Participatory investigation: Tenerife

Authors El Observatorio de la Inmigración de Tenerife (OBITen)
Description
«Snapshots From The Borders» is a 3-years project, co-funded by the European Union and run by 36 partners, border local authorities and civil society organisations, led by the Lampedusa and Linosa municipality. The main general objective of the project is the improvement of the critical understanding of European and local decision and law makers, civil servants, opinion leaders, public opinion and citizens about the topic of migration flows towards European borders. Our aim is strengthening a new horizontal, active network of cities and towns directly facing migration flows at EU borders, as a way to promote more and more effective policy coherence at all levels. The final perspective and framework is to achieve UN Sustainable Development Goals.This report has been carried out through the analysis of secondary statistical data sources available at the national and local levels; the results of different empirical investigations undertaken by the Immigration Observatory of Tenerife in the last 15 years; and 23 semi-structured interviews with university experts, representatives from immigrant associations, professionals from NGOs, immigrants and their children, political representatives, technicians from the local governments, and participants in social movements linked to the defence of human rights. All the interviews have been recorded on video and a script with questions has been used, based on this report’s structure, but with the questions adapted to the profiles of each person interviewed.
Year 2019
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33229 Report

European Ars Nova: Multilingual Poetry and Polyphonic Song in the Late Middle Ages

Description
Dante Alighieri at the dawn of the 1300s, as well as Eustache Deschamps almost a century later, conceived poetry as music in itself. But what happens with poetry when it is involved in the complex architecture of polyphony? The aim of this project is to study for the first time the corpus of 14th- and early 15th-century poetry set to music by Ars Nova polyphonists (more than 1200 texts). This repertoire gathers different poetic and musical traditions, as shown by the multilingual anthologies copied during the last years of the Schism. The choice of this corpus is motivated by two primary goals: a) to offer a new interpretation of its meaning and function in the cultural and historical context, one that may be then applied to the rest of coeval European lyric poetry; b) to overcome current disciplinary divisions in order to generate a new methodological balance between the project’s two main fields of interest (Comparative Literature / Musicology). Most Ars Nova polyphonists were directly associated with religious institutions. In many texts, the language of courtly love expresses the values of caritas, the theological virtue that guides wise rulers and leads them to desire the common good. Thus, the poetic figure of the lover becomes a metaphor for the political man, and love poetry can be used as a device for diplomacy, as well as for personal and institutional propaganda. From this unprecedented point of view, the project will develop three research lines in response to the following questions: 1) How is the relationship between poetry and music, and how is the dialogue between the different poetic and musical traditions viewed in relation to each context of production? 2) To what extent does Ars Nova poetry take part in the ‘soft power’ strategies exercised by the entire European political class of the time? 3) Is there a connection between the multilingualism of the manuscript tradition and the perception of the Ars Nova as a European, intercultural repertoire?
Year 2019
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33230 Project

VoteEuropa

Principal investigator ()
Description
VoteEuropa is a campaign funded by the European Parliament to mobilise and encourage volunteers and voters among mobile EU citizens, naturalised migrants and refugees and young people of diverse backgrounds to vote in the European elections in May 2019.
Year 2019
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33231 Project

Migrant Children and Communities in a Transforming Europe

Description
The overall objective of the project is to stimulate the inclusion of diverse groups of migrant children by adopting a child-centred approach to their integration at the educational and policy level. Stemming from the need to revisit the integration policies on the one hand and consistent with the specific focus of the call on the other hand, the research project aims at comprehensive examination of contemporary integration processes of migrant children in order to empower them. The project starts from the fact that European countries and their education systems encounter manifold challenges due to growing ethnic, cultural, linguistic diversity and thereby aims at: 1) Identifying existing measures for the integration of migrant children at the regional and local level through secondary data analysis; 2) Analysis of the social impacts of these integration programmes through case studies in ten countries applying qualitative and quantitative child-centred research; 3) Development of integration measures and identification of social investment particularly in educational policies and school systems that aim to empower children. The project is problem-driven and exploratory at the same time. Its exploratory part mainly concerns a child-centred approach to understanding integration challenges, migrants’ needs and their well-being. However, the findings of the open-ended exploratory research will be used in an explicitly problem-driven way – with an aim to stimulate migrant inclusion, to empower migrant children and build their skills already within the (participatory) research. This will be done through the activities of the Integration Lab and Policy Lab, where children’s voices, fieldwork and desk research findings will be translated into practices and measures for educational professionals and practitioners as well as into a child-centred migrant integration policy framework to stimulate social inclusion and successful management of cultural diversity.
Year 2019
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33232 Project

Virtual asylum – Hiding Refugees from the all-seeing Eye of Europe

Principal investigator Veronika Nagy (Principal Investigator)
Description
" As an interdisciplinary, multi/sited analysis of refugee surveillance, this research addresses geopolitical incentives in the EU and how surveillance subjects as forced migrants from conflict countries use virtual coping strategies to prevent legal expulsion. The central research question is: How the interplay between digitized bureaucracies of migration control and the coping strategies of refugees from Islamic states shapes the dynamics of online mobility control? This study aims to provide empirical data on the mechanisms of surveillance strategies that promote efficiency and objectivity and how service dependent migrants adapt their coping strategies according to the constantly changing risk profiles of screening instruments as the tools of social sorting. Virtual control measures are not only reflecting the values and categories of the host society, but also how individual parameters are translated into risk categories. Unlike studies defining transnational mobility in terms of migration categories, this research is embedded in critical security theories to reveal the dynamics and constantly shifting nature of population flows and explore how stigmatized refugees adapt to rapidly changing circumstances by inventive virtual data sharing methods in the bureaucratic labyrinth of host societies. This project challenges the underlying assumptions behind this efficiency oriented governance technologies and by selected empirical data it provides a critical analysis on the limitations of surveillance and control practices and its implications on institutional distrust. "
Year 2019
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33233 Project

The Hau of Finance: Impact Investing and the Globalization of Social and Environmental Sustainability

Description
Impact investing is a major emerging phenomenon in global finance that promises to reconcile capitalism with sustainability. It is increasingly embraced by governments, civil society and the private sector in the Global North and South to solve social and environmental problems. The combined crises of climate change, inequality and mass migration in a context of economic austerity have spurred cross-sectoral impact investing partnerships in areas such as green infrastructure, women’s entrepreneurship, agroecology, refugee support and disease prevention. This burgeoning $200bn market promises flexible, holistic and profitable paths to sustainability, attracting major philanthropic organisations and institutional investors boasting fresh ethical and responsible mandates. Is impact investing merely a new frontier for capitalism, or does it represent a revolutionary chapter in global history? Will it benefit communities better than conventional development programmes? The time to answer these questions is now, as impact investing is still in its infancy and the first green and social stock exchanges are opening around the world. IMPACT HAU is an innovative, critical and comparative anthropological study of the moral and political dimensions of impact investing. Inspired by Marcel Mauss’s classic use of the Maori concept of hau, the ‘spirit of the gift’, it focuses on the designers, traders and beneficiaries of impact bonds to produce an empirically driven analysis of the multiple moral orders within contemporary capitalism. Six ethnographic case studies will provide grounded, detailed accounts of the design and implementation of impact investing in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. These will support a critical appraisal of the current consensus among global policymakers and business leaders giving markets a determining role in the ecological transition, testing the theories of sustainability that underpin hopes for a socially inclusive green economy.
Year 2019
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33234 Project

Organized Violence, New Migration Patterns and Development: A Comparative Study in Europe and the Americas

Principal investigator Ludger Pries (Principal Investigator ), Stephanie Schütze (Principal Investigator )
Description
Understanding international migration and especially forced migration is of increasing importance for development and stability at both national and global scales. Since the 1990s, the nexus of migration and development has been studied extensively. However, during the last two decades organized violence has emerged as a key factor in the relation between migration and development. In some cases, it can be clearly identified as the fueling factor for international migration processes (e.g., civil wars in Central America and the Middle East). Elsewhere for example, in transition countries it might have an extractive relation with migration (e.g., migration officials operating organized extortion against migrants and criminal networks of human trafficking). In arrival countries, organized violence appears as illicit employment networks, homegrown terrorist cells, or xenophobic aggression by political groups (e.g, in the United States and Germany). At the same time, these different articulations of violence and migration reflect development-related factors that shape their outcome. Sometimes organized violence is an outcome of lack of sustainable development or of armed conflicts over resources, political power, or socio-cultural influence; at others it is the cause of absent development or massive migration. The concept of organized violence offers a promising approach for understanding new migration patterns and development, yet one whose explanatory potential has not yet received adequate scholarly attention. As a category, it captures forms of social violence that are difficult to grasp with the conventional conceptual frameworks of organized crime, collective violence, and political violence. Given its importance for the Central and Northern American region as well as the Africa-Middle-East-Europe region, a comparative international research integrating the strengths of different regional contexts and academic communities is propitious. Therefore, this research project will compare and contrast forms of violence, focusing in particular on organized violence, and how these shape migration patterns and development. The research team consists of two institutional partners: Lateinamerika-Institut of Freie Universität Berlin and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, headed by Ludger Pries (RUB) and Stephanie Schütze (FU) as principal investigators. The two partner institutions will collaborate in this project with scholars from El Colegio de México and Universidad de Guadalajara in Mexico, Koç University and Orien-Institut Istanbul in Turkey, and the University of Illinois at Chicago in the United States.
Year 2019
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33235 Project

Nativism, Islamophobism and Islamism in the Age of Populism: Culturalisation and Religionisation of what is Social, Economic and Political in Europe

Description
The main research question of the study is: How and why do some European citizens generate a populist and Islamophobist discourse to express their discontent with the current social, economic and political state of their national and European contexts, while some members of migrant-origin communities with Muslim background generate an essentialist and radical form of Islamist discourse within the same societies? The main premise of this study is that various segments of the European public (radicalizing young members of both native populations and migrant-origin populations with Muslim background), who have been alienated and swept away by the flows of globalization such as deindustrialization, mobility, migration, tourism, social-economic inequalities, international trade, and robotic production, are more inclined to respectively adopt two mainstream political discourses: Islamophobism (for native populations) and Islamism (for Muslim-migrant-origin populations). Both discourses have become pivotal along with the rise of the civilizational rhetoric since the early 1990s. On the one hand, the neo-liberal age seems to be leading to the nativisation of radicalism among some groups of host populations while, on the other hand, it is leading to the islamization of radicalism among some segments of deprived migrant-origin populations. The common denominator of these groups is that they are both downwardly mobile and inclined towards radicalization. Hence, this project aims to scrutinize social, economic, political and psychological sources of the processes of radicalization among native European youth and Muslim-origin youth with migration background, who are both inclined to express their discontent through ethnicity, culture, religion, heritage, homogeneity, authenticity, past, gender and patriarchy. The field research will comprise four migrant receiving countries: Germany, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, and two migrant sending countries: Turkey and Morocco.
Year 2019
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33236 Project

Determinants of ‘Mobilisation’ at Home and Abroad: Analysing the Micro-Foundations of Out-Migration & Mass Protest

Principal investigator Olga Onuch (Principal Investigator), Gwendolyn Sasse (Principal Investigator), Jacquelien; van Stekelenburg (Principal Investigator), Sorana Toma (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Connecting theoretical expectations from the migration and protest literatures, we examine: a) whether similar factors drive the choice to migrate and/or protest at the individual level; b) how context affects this mobilisation; c) whether these choices are independent of each other or mutually reinforcing/ undermining. MOBILISE employs a multi-method (nationally representative face-to-face panel surveys, online migrant surveys, protest participant surveys, focus groups, life-history interviews, social media analysis) and a multi-sited research design. It covers Ukraine, Poland, Morocco and Brazil, which have recently witnessed large-scale emigration and protests. It follows migrants from these countries to Germany, the UK and Spain. The project offers four key innovations: it combines protest and migration; it captures all the relevant groups for a comparative study (protesters, migrants, migrant protesters and people who have not engaged in migration or protest); it tracks individuals over time by employing a panel survey; it includes the use of social media data providing real time information on the role of networks and political remittances. These features allow the project to make a major contribution to theory development in both migration and protest studies and offer key insights to policy makers on factors influencing political and economic stability."
Year 2019
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33237 Project

The Role of the Welfare State in the Integration of Immigrants: Comparative Analysis of Latino Communities in Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States

Description
The purpose of this project is to determine the role of the Welfare State in the integration of immigrants. The project seeks to understand (1) how immigrants obtain information about, and access to, local and national social assistance programs, (2) how their experiences vary across Welfare States and (3) how these experiences shapes their identity formation, which, in turn, can either help or hinder their integration into the host society. This research is based on an original approach based on in-depth semi-structured interviews with Latino immigrants in three countries. This project focuses on Latino immigrants because they are a large immigrant group in each of the sites, enabling a comparison of Welfare States. This research offers an innovative perspective on the relations between social services (and social service providers) and recipients of these services. Contrary to most studies in healthcare policy, which focus on the experiences of social workers while minimizing those of immigrants, this project focuses on the experiences of immigrants. The uniqueness of this research also lies in the fact that it comparatively examines the experiences with policies put in place by countries offering different social benefits and categorized as different types of Welfare States. It addresses larger sociological, political and legal issues related to identity formation, immigrant integration and the role of public policies in shaping these processes. The project’s ambition is to create models of integration through social services, which would apply to broader contexts and therefore allow for the applicability of the findings in different contexts. The transferability of the results will offer a stepping stone to improve our understanding of the complexities of immigrant integration into the host society across different countries, thereby advancing knowledge and informing policy on Migration Studies at the European and International levels.
Year 2019
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33238 Project

The refugee ‘crisis’ in Greece: politicisation and polarisation amidst multiple crises

Authors Angeliki DIMITRIADI, Antonia-Maria SARANTAKI
Description
The European refugee “crisis” of 2015 first and foremost unfolded in Greece at a critical period for the country and its place in the EU. Amidst the threat of Grexit and domestic political turmoil, the arrival of the refugees raised to the forefront questions of responsibility and burden sharing between Greece and its EU partners. Drawing from de Wilde’s analytical framework, this paper tried to explore whether the question of responsibility became an issue of politicisation in Greece as well as polarisation and whether it resulted in policy change on migration. The analysis draws from three types of sources: online media, parliamentary debates & party announcements, and public opinion polls. Two periods are investigated: the discussion on relocation from May 2015 to November 2015 and the discussions on the EU-Turkey Statement of March 2016. Politicisation of migration pre-existed the crisis and acquired further salience during 2015-2016. Polarisation, in contrast, featured less in 2015, due to the focus on Grexit, but acquires salience in 2016 following the EU-Turkey Statement. Nonetheless two common themes underscore both periods. There is convergence (with varying degrees of intensity) in blaming the member states for failing to adhere to their responsibility and for showing little solidarity. Similarly, there is a broad convergence that migration policy is designed by the European Union and its institutions, with Greece only responsible for the implementation. Thus, the polarisation of 2016 over migration focuses more on the government’s poor implementation and less on the policies initiated at the EU level.
Year 2019
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33239 Report

Paperless and Jobless: The Undocumented Status and Access to Employment among Latino Youth

Authors Elżbieta Goździak, Joseph Russel-Jenkins
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33240 Journal Article

The long duration of the flight – Analyses form scholarly debate and practice

Authors Josef Kohlbacher, Maria Six-Hohenbalken
Year 2019
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33241 Book

Expatriate Childhood. Children's Experiences of Temporary Migration.

Principal investigator Mari Korpela ()
Description
Project description: Increasing numbers of highly educated migrants work abroad temporarily. Often, these expatriates are accompanied by their children but very little is known about the children although their wellbeing is important for the families’ comfort. This ethnographic study investigates such children (8-15 years old) in Finland. The study asks how the children experience their temporary migration and their lifestyle that includes frequent transnational mobility. What kind of lives do they lead? How do they negotiate their identities and place within the current system of nation states? What the significance of nationalities, cosmopolitanism and class is? The project investigates the children’s lives and views, develops theory on transnational mobility and child migration, and produces information for policy-makers, teachers, expatriate families and children. Research material includes field diaries on participant observation, interviews, and visual data produced together with the children.
Year 2019
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33242 Project

‘I Want to Stay Here Forever’: Narratives of Resistance amongst Polish-born Adolescents in the UK

Authors Sara Young
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33243 Journal Article

Paperless and Jobless: The Undocumented Status and Access to Employment among Latino Youth

Authors Elżbieta Goździak
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33244 Journal Article

The Status of Foreign Immigrant Crime in South Korea

Authors Dohee Jeong
Year 2019
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33245 Policy Brief

VOLPOWER; the role of volunteers in migrant incorporation

Principal investigator ()
Description
Glasgow Caledonian University leads the EU AMIF (Asylum and Migrant Integration Fund) funded two-year project VOLPOWER: Enhancing Community Building and Social Integration through Dialogue and Collaboration amongst Young Europeans and Third Country Nationals. The project team consists of Professor Umut Korkut as coordinator, and Dr Fiona Reid and Dr Fiona Skillen as Principal Investigators as well as Marcus Nicolson as the Project Manager. GCU leads a consortium composed of Erasmus University Rotterdam, Austrian Academy of Sciences – Institute for Urban and Regional Research, EURAC-Institute for Minority Rights Bolzano, Zavod APIS Slovenia, SOS Malta, and IRMO Croatia. Volpower explores how youth volunteering in sports and arts activities can serve as a mechanism for social integration for youth. Sport and arts activities by their very nature demand high levels of interaction between participants. We believe that this interaction could help to foster, and facilitate community building and mutual understanding. In particular, we will be working with EU Nationals and Third Country Nationals in order to understand the challenges TCN’s face when settling within a new community. We hope that our research will demonstrate the power that volunteering can have in terms of empowering individuals within their local communities. The project will examine these ideas by working with volunteers in sport and arts organisations from across Europe. The main aims of this project are to initiate youth volunteering in sport and arts related activities amongst EU and TCNs in order to explore the effects which volunteering has on an individual’s or communities’ sense of social integration. The specific project objectives are summarised as follows: To increase integration of TCN volunteers into local communities through sport and arts volunteering, exposing TCNs to informal and formal institutions within their localities. To improve partnership between EUN and TCN volunteers through sports and arts volunteering. To provide participants with intercultural skills as well as life and leadership skills. 
 To generate communication between the local communities and volunteers of TCN and EUN backgrounds. To foreground the value of volunteering for community building through developing partnerships between the sports and arts volunteers and community stakeholders. To foster common grounds and goals for sustainable partnerships through dialogue, collaboration, and resource sharing enhanced by sports and arts volunteering. To assess practices for the inclusion of TCNs at the micro-community level via sports and arts and how participation in these activities forge intercultural dialogue and processes of integration. To introduce digital tools in illustrating good practice in volunteering. 

Year 2019
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33246 Project

Forced displacement and refugee-host community solidarity (FOCUS)

Principal investigator Nahikari Irastorza (Project Leader), Jason Tucker (Project Leader ), Pieter Bevelander (Participants)
Description
This project starts from the basic assumptions that forced migration to the European Union will continue in the future due to a number of different push and pull factors, that influx of refugees will influence the social, political and economic landscape of receiving societies, and that there are a variety of costs and benefits of integrating refugees in the host societies that are reflected in relational dynamics between the host and refugee communities. Bearing these considerations in mind, the goal of FOCUS is to increase the understanding of and to provide effective and evidence-based solutions for the challenges of forced migration within host communities. By doing so, it also aims at contributing to increased tolerance, peaceful coexistence, and reduced radicalization across Europe and the Middle East. Based on a comprehensive mapping and trans-disciplinary, multi-site field research conducted in Jordan, Croatia, Germany and Sweden, FOCUS explores the socio-psychological dimensions of refugee and host-community relations and analyses the socio-economic integration of refugees and the consequences of this in host societies. This knowledge is then used to transform and strengthen existing promising solutions for social and labour market integration. The integration solutions will be pilot tested in at least five European countries by governmental and non-governmental end-users. The solutions are finally brought together in the Refugee and Host Community Toolbox, which will support policy makers, municipal actors, civil society organisations and other stakeholders in responding to the needs of both refugees and host communities and thereby act as agents of change in this field.
Year 2019
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33247 Project

A Global Information Society? Why digital services for refugees often fail to achieve their objectives

Authors Carlotta Preiss, German Development Institute (DIE)
Year 2019
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33248 Policy Brief

Refugees’ Self-selection into Europe: Who Migrates Where?

Authors Cevat Giray Aksoy, Panu Poutvaara
Year 2019
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33249 Working Paper

Immigration, Integration, and Naturalization: New Immigrants, Policy Decisions and Citizens’ Responses

Principal investigator Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator ), Richard Traunmüller (Principal Investigator )
Description
The way migration flows and immigrant integration are regulated hasbecome of crucial interest in both scholarly and public debates. Whilethere is now ample research on the general question of whether moreor less migrants should be allowed to access one's country we stillknow very little about how specific regulations are perceived bycitizens and how they impact on their attitudes and behaviours and thus, ultimately, their acceptance of newcomers. This project aims atproviding evidence-based answers to the following question: What arethe consequences of immigration, integration and naturalizationpolicies for citizens attitudes and actual behaviour related to theacceptance of new immigrant groups? In order to reach our intendedresearch goals we will design two surveys including different surveyexperiments which will be conducted in Germany. The experiments will allow us toidentify the causal impact of policies on attitudes and behaviour in amore thorough way. To get a more nuanced picture of policy effectswe will confront them with policies by means of survey vignettes.Finally, to get a grasp of the rational interests of ordinary citizens wewill measure the effects of policies on attitudes towards migrants as afunction of the degree of agreement with these policies and as afunction of whether these policies change the status quo or not for thenatives themselves.
Year 2019
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33250 Project

Albanian Migration as a Post-Totalitarian Legacy

Authors Agata Domachowska
Year 2019
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne – Przegląd Polonijny
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33252 Journal Article

Diaspora networks in international marketing: How do ethnic products diffuse to foreign markets?

Authors Xiaotian Zhang, Susana Costa e Silva, Maria Elo, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
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33253 Journal Article

Clothing, fashion and nation building in the Land of Israel

Description
Culture is central to nation building, but clothing, fashion and aesthetic perceptions are often overlooked in this context. Taking 'Eretz Israel' (the 'Land of Israel') as a case study, this project argues that investigating these cultural practices brings to the fore the agency of migrant groups and adds a personal dimension to the history of nation building. Focusing on the period from the 1880s when large-scale migration began, until the foundation of the Israeli state in 1948, it investigates how Eastern European and German Jewish immigrants expressed social, cultural and political belonging through clothing and to what extent they were able to enforce their ideologies in the course of nation building. It asks to what extent the immigrants influenced each other in developing a specific mode of dress, and how they referenced the socio-cultural and political practices of countries of origin, as well as the clothing of Arab people and the Ottoman and British occupying authorities. With an unprecedented focus on gender and visual materials, the project examines how clothing became fashion and to what extent a consensual mode of dress emerged within a heterogeneous migrant society. Drawing from archival collections of 15 archives in Israel, Poland and England, and 6 Israeli, German, American and Russian databases, the project analyses private and public photographs and posters, and contextualises them against an assessment of written material and oral history interviews. Through highly interdisciplinary training, the project develops a new methodology that integrates approaches from fashion history and visual culture into the history of nation building to shed light on the processes of negotiation and power struggles on the micro level of a community. In times of mass migration, economic exploitation and global mobility the project contributes to an understanding of aesthetic perceptions, dress and beauty ideals as an expression of power, integration and exclusion.
Year 2019
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33254 Project

The appeal of the Netherlands to knowlegde migrants

Authors WODC, Corine Buers, Jeanine Klaver, ...
Description
The aim of the study was to obtain insight into how the immigration policy can make the Netherlands (more) attractive to highly skilled migrants and more particularly how the IND and other parties involved can improve services to these migrants. The study provides insight into the reasons why highly skilled migrants choose the Netherlands and their experiences with Dutch entry policy and services. By highly skilled migrants, we mean all highly qualified workers from outside the EU/EEA who are working in the Netherlands as knowledge migrants. Besides providing insight into the choices and experiences of highly skilled migrants, this study formulates concrete starting points for improving services to this group of migrants. This could ul-timately boost the appeal of the Netherlands as a host and career country.
Year 2018
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33256 Report

Contesting the deportation state? : political change aspirations in protests against forced returns

Authors Leila HADJ-ABDOU, Sieglinde ROSENBERG
Year 2018
Journal Name Ethnic and racial studies, 2018, Vol. 42, No. 16, pp. 102-119
33257 Journal Article

The Immigrant as a Not-invented “Other”

Authors Krystyna Romaniszyn
Year 2018
Journal Name Studia Polonijne
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33258 Journal Article

Gobernanza migratoria en América del Sur : ¿hacia una nueva oleada restrictiva?

Authors Leiza Maricel BRUMAT, Diego ACOSTA, Marcia VERA ESPINOZA
Year 2018
Book Title [Migration Policy Centre]
33259 Book Chapter

Reintegration package for Ethiopia

Authors Katie KUSCHMINDER, Alexandra RICARD-GUAY
Description
Ethiopia has been facing an increased return of migrants, as a result of mass deportation from countries like Saudi Arabia, The Government of Ethiopia, together with other humanitarian actors successfully managed the return but, due to the absence of a national framework on reintegration, the reintegration component was not addressed. Hence this report presents the recommended approach for developing a reintegration package for return migrants in Ethiopia. This package is expected to serve as a point of reference and practical guide for the Government of Ethiopia, UN agencies, civil society organizations and other stakeholders to develop programs in support of the successful reintegration of returnees, back into their community and labour market.
Year 2018
33261 Report

Fit for purpose? : the Facilitation Directive and the criminalisation of humanitarian assistance to irregular migrants : 2018 update

Authors Sergio CARRERA, Gabriella SANCHEZ, Lina VOSYLIUTE, ...
Description
This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, aims to update the 2016 study “Fit for purpose? The Facilitation Directive and the criminalisation of humanitarian assistance to irregular migrants”. It takes stock of and examines the latest developments that have taken place since 2016, specifically the legislative and policy changes, along with various forms and cases of criminalisation of humanitarian actors, migrants’ family members and basic service providers. The study uses the notion of ‘policing humanitarianism’ to describe not only cases of formal prosecution and sentencing in criminal justice procedures, but also wider dynamics of suspicion, intimidation, harassment and disciplining in five selected Member States – Belgium, France, Greece, Hungary and Italy. Policing humanitarianism negatively affects EU citizens’ rights – such as the freedom of assembly, freedom of speech and freedom of conscience. When civil society is effectively (self-)silenced and its accountability role undermined, policies to combat migrant smuggling may be overused and give rise to serious breaches of the EU’s founding values, notably the rule of law, democracy and fundamental rights. Moreover, policing humanitarianism negatively affects wider societal trust and diverts the limited resources of law enforcement from investigating more serious crimes.
Year 2018
33262 Report

Do good, stay well. Well-being and work satisfaction among German refugee helpers: A national cross-sectional study

Authors Eva Jobst, Christine Gall, Christian Eiche, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name PLOS ONE
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33263 Journal Article

I Trafficking in and Smuggling of Human Beings: the Spanish Approach

Authors E. García Coso, C. Gortázar Rotaeche, A. Obregón Garcíai
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
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33266 Book Chapter

Trafficking and Smuggling in Human Beings: the British Perspective

Authors Dora Kostakopoulou
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33267 Book Chapter

On Policy Ghosts: EU Readmission Arrangements as Intersecting Policy Universes

Authors Sergio Carrera
Year 2018
Book Title EU External Migration Policies in an Era of Global Mobilities: Intersecting Policy Universes
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33268 Book Chapter

Europe Beyond Its Borders: Refugee And Human Rights Protection In Extraterritorial Immigration Control

Authors Maarten Den Heijer
Year 2018
Book Title Extraterritorial Immigration Control
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33269 Book Chapter

The External Dimension of the EU’s Migration Policy

Authors Katharina Eisele
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33270 Book

New Asylum Countries?

Authors Gregor Noll, Rosemary rne, Jens Vedsted-Hansen
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33271 Book

The Externalisation Of European Migration Control And The Reach Of International Refugee Law

Authors T. Gammeltoft-Hansen
Year 2018
Book Title The First Decade of EU Migration and Asylum Law
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33272 Book Chapter

What Happened to Equality?

Authors Bjarney Friðriksdóttir
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33273 Book

Chapter 29. Victims of Trafficking or Smuggling

Authors Nicola Rogers, Steve Peers
Year 2018
Book Title EU Immigration and Asylum Law
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33274 Book Chapter

Trafficking and Smuggling in France: Social Problems as Transnational Security Issues

Authors Virginie Guiraudon
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
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33275 Book Chapter

Aviation as deportation infrastructure: airports, planes, and expulsion

Authors William Walters
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 4
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33276 Journal Article

The human smuggling industry : nuances and complexities

Authors Luigi ACHILLI
Year 2018
33277 Working Paper

The Legal Framework Concerning The Smuggling Of Migrants At Sea Under The Un Protocol On The Smuggling Of Migrants By Land, Sea And Air

Authors Tom Obokata
Year 2018
Book Title Extraterritorial Immigration Control
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33278 Book Chapter

Conclusions: the Variable Political and Legal Geography of People Smuggling and Trafficking in Europe

Authors Elspeth Guild
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33279 Book Chapter

Trafficking in and Smuggling of Human Beings: the Spanish Approach - II Main Issues On Spanish Alien Law And Practice Concerning Trafficking And Smuggling Of Human Beings

Authors Paul Minderhoud, Elspeth Guild
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33281 Book Chapter

Immigration Without Incorporation: EU Migration Policy in a Post-Citizenship Europe?

Authors Peo Hansen
Year 2018
Book Title The Reconceptualization of European Union Citizenship
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33282 Book Chapter

Immigration Law in the European Community

Authors Elspeth Guild
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33283 Book

The Place and Role of International Human Rights Law in the EU Return Directive and in the Related cjeu Case-Law: Approaches Worlds Apart?

Authors Tamás Molnár
Year 2018
Book Title EU External Migration Policies in an Era of Global Mobilities: Intersecting Policy Universes
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33284 Book Chapter

Social Working of Criminal Law on Trafficking and Smuggling in Human Beings in Germany

Authors Dita Vogel, Norbert Cyrus
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33285 Book Chapter

Migrating rituals: negotiations of belonging and otherness among Tamils in Norway

Authors Anne Sigfrid Gronseth
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 2
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33286 Journal Article

The (surprising?) nonchalance of migration control agents

Authors Tobias G. Eule
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES
Citations (WoS) 1
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33287 Journal Article

Intersecting Policies of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Migration in the EU and the Netherlands

Authors Tesseltje de Lange
Year 2018
Book Title EU External Migration Policies in an Era of Global Mobilities: Intersecting Policy Universes
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33288 Book Chapter

The Legal Framework of Trafficking and Smuggling in Germany: Victim Protection Emerging from Witness Protection?

Authors Katja S. Ziegler
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33289 Book Chapter

EU Citizenship, Nationality and Migrant Status

Authors Kristīne Krūma
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33290 Book

III. Main Issues in Spanish Criminal Law and Practice Related to Trafficking in and Smuggling of Human Beings

Authors E. García Coso, C. Gortázar Rotaeche, A. Obregón Garcíai
Year 2018
Book Title Immigration and Criminal Law in the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33292 Book Chapter

Non-removable migrants in Europe : an atypical migration status?

Authors Benedita MENEZES QUEIROZ
Year 2018
Journal Name European public law
33293 Journal Article

Beyond crisis talk : interrogating migration and crises in Europe

Authors Nick DINES, Nicola MONTAGNA, Elena VACCHELLI
Year 2018
Journal Name Sociology : the journal of the British sociological association, 2018, Vol. 52, No. 3, pp. 439-447
33294 Journal Article

Communicating the 'migrant' other as risk: space, EU and expanding borders

Authors Yasmin Ibrahim, Anita Howarth
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF RISK RESEARCH
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33296 Journal Article

TIME, SPACE, AND SKILLS IN DESIGNING MIGRATION POLICY

Authors Michal Burzynski
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF DEMOGRAPHIC ECONOMICS
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33297 Journal Article

How China manages economic-stream migration: The new points scheme

Authors Bjoern Ahl, Pilar-Paz Czoske
Year 2018
Journal Name ASIAN AND PACIFIC MIGRATION JOURNAL
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33298 Journal Article

THEY SHOULD STAY THERE: THE STORY OF MEXICAN MIGRATION AND REPATRIATION DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION

Authors Brandon Morgan
Year 2018
Journal Name LATIN AMERICANIST
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33300 Journal Article
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