I am Assistant Professor at the Department of Migration and Globalisation at Danube University, Krems, which I joined in September 2018. Previously, I worked as a senior researcher at ICMPD`s research department, and between 2011 and 2015, also led the research departmen. A political scientist and Africanist by training (MA from the University of Vienna, of which one year at SOAS, University of London, PhD from the University of Vienna), I also held fellowships at the SCMR, University of Sussex (2003-2004)...

Roles

  • Danube University Krems

    University, Krems, Austria
    Assistant Professor

Research

The Political Accommodation of Immigrant Religious Practices: The Case of Special Admission Rules for Ministers of Religion

Authors Albert Kraler
Year 2007
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 6
1 Journal Article

CLANDESTINO: Irregular Migration: Counting the uncountable. Data and trends across Europe

Year 2007
Abstract
This interdisciplinary project is a response to the need for supporting policy makers in designing and implementing appropriate policies regarding irregular migration. The project aims: (a) to provide an inventory of data and estimates on irregular migration (stocks and flows) in selected EU countries, (b) to analyse these data comparatively, (c) to discuss the ethical and methodological issues involved in the collection of data, the elaboration of estimates and their use, (d) to propose a new method for evaluating data/estimates on irregular migration in the EU. The project will address these aims in selected EU countries (Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain in southern Europe; Netherlands, UK, Germany and Austria in Western and Central Europe; Poland, Hungary, Slovakia in Central Eastern Europe). It will also look at transit migration in countries/regions used as key "stepping stones" by irregular migrants en route to the EU, notably Turkey, Ukraine and one Maghreb country. Where relevant, the project will consider the factors affecting the shift between legal and undocumented status among migrant populations. The project consortium involves 4 academic partners, one policy institute and one NGO. The first five partners (based in Austria, Britain, Germany, Greece and Poland) will be engaged in empirical and theoretical research for the project in the countries where they are based. They will also select, assign and coordinate the work of national experts based in the other European countries. The project plans include dissemination activities at the local/national level and European level organised by the NGO partner in several among the countries studied.
2 Project

REGINE: Regularisations in Europe: Study on practices in the area of regularisation of illegally staying third-country nationals in the Member States of the EU

Year 2007
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
REGINE is a research project on regularisation practices in the European Union. In order to gain insights in regularisation practices and the impact of regularisations elsewhere two additional non-EU countries– Switzerland and the US – has been also covered. Objectives: 1) To provide a thorough mapping of practices relating to the regularisation of third country nationals illegally resident in EU Member States. 2) To investigate the relationship of regularisation policies to the overall migration policy framework, including to protection issues and refugee policies. 3) To examine the political position of different stakeholders towards regularisation policies on the national level. 4) To examine potential options for policies on regularisation on the European level, incorporating Member States as well as other stakeholders’ views on possible instruments on the European level. NOTE: Data for the project has been gathered through a questionnaire addressed to EU Member States and additional questionnaires addressed to NGOs and Trade Unions.
3 Project

DEMANDAT: Addressing demand in anti-trafficking efforts and policies (DemandAT)

Year 2014
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
The project investigates the notion of ‘demand’ for trafficking in human beings (THB) from a range of scientific perspectives and develops an integrated framework that comprehensively addresses and relates demand with alternative framings where appropriate. The findings provide empirical evidence to concrete policy questions on the EU agenda and lay-out the full range of promising policy options. The project consortium engages in continuous, intensive communication efforts with the objective of ensuring a good take-up of research results by policy-makers, other stakeholders and the wider society. Work will proceed in three phases: • Phase 1 involves a comprehensive analysis of theoretical and empirical literature as well as an overview over debates with regard to trafficking for different purposes (commercial sex, labor exploitation, child begging, forced marriages, organ removal and criminal activities), and a mapping of demand related policy measures in different countries. On this basis, a joint conceptual approach will be developed. • Phase 2 involves five in-depth empirical case studies. Three of them address specific fields with systematic differences with regard to the type of demand linked to trafficking: Domestic work, prostitution and imported goods which are provided through global supply chains. Two case studies investigate specifically relevant policy approaches (law enforcement and raising awareness through campaigns). • Phase 3 integrates insights from both phases into a coherent framework and intensifies dissemination which is informed by continuous, systematic stakeholder communication throughout the project.
4 Project

Gender, Generations and the Family in International Migration

Authors Albert Kraler, Camille Schmoll, Eleonore Kofman, ...
Year 2012
5 Book

Migration Statistics in Europe: A Core Component of Governance and Population Research

Authors Albert Kraler, David Reichel, Han Entzinger
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
6 Book Chapter

Introduction. Family Migration as an Integration Issue? Policy Perspectives and Academic Insights .

Authors Saskia Bonjour, Albert Kraler
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Family Issues
Citations (WoS) 21
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
7 Journal Article

Climate Change & Migration: What is the Role for Migration Policies?

Authors Albert Kraler, Tatiana Cernei Cernei, Marion Noack
Year 2012
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
9 Policy Brief

European Policy Brief: The Demand-Side in Anti-Trafficking – Current measures and ways forward

Authors Dita Vogel, Mădălina Rogoz, Albert Kraler
Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
11 Policy Brief

FastPass: A harmonized, modular reference system for all European automatic border crossing points

Year 2013
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
Automatic border controls are an increasingly relevant mode by which borders are crossed, both in the European Union and around the world. The Fastpass project aims to establish and demonstrate a next generation harmonised, modular approach for Automated Border Control (ABC) systems. To do so, it brings together key stakeholders involved throughout the development of an ABC system: system and component producers, research institutions, governmental authorities and end users. The ICMPD Research Department is particularly involved in engaging users and other stakeholders, as well as analysing the needs and requirements necessary for an ABC system. The ICMPD Border Management and Visa Competence Centre is also involved in interacting with and training border guards to use the system, as well as ensuring the needs of the end user group of border guards are also included. Objectives: • Integration of the Smart Border components of an exit-entry system and a registered traveller programme within the system; • Harmonised use of the system across a variety of countries, based on feedback from travellers and border guards; • Development of an innovative border crossing concept that interfaces with existing security and infrastructure processes at air, land and sea borders; • Design and inclusion of innovative technology with regard to ABC systems; • Establishment of a European ABC solution, and a new European ABC suppliers network Project Partners: Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (AIT), Teknologian tutkimuskeskus VTT, Austrian Federal Ministry of the Interior, Österreichische Staatsdruckerei GmbH, Fraunhofer IOSB, Interdisciplinary Center for Law and ICT of K.U. Leuven, Finnish Border Guard RVL, Secunet Security Networks AG, Mirasys Ltd, Regula Baltija Ltd, University of Reading, University of Tampere, Gunnebo Entrance Control Ltd, Giesecke & Devrient GmbH, MODI Modular Digits GmbH, Magnetic Autocontrol GmbH, European Commission Joint Research Center, ITTE Sp.z.o.o., Deltabit Oy, Oxford Internet Institute of the University of Oxford, Romanian Border Guard, Finavia Cooperation, Port of Mykonos, Fraport AG, Flughafen Wien AG, Intrepid Minds.
12 Project

Migrants In Countries In Crisis

Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
The Migrants in Countries in Crisis project aims at providing accessible, methodologically robust and policy relevant data on the migration implications of crisis situations in host countries. It does so with the broader objective of informing efforts to strengthen the preparedness of countries of origin, transit and destination and of other relevant actors to address and respond to future crises. Research objectives: Crisis situations investigated include natural disaster, violent conflict or civil unrest, which have led to a breakdown of or serious challenges to public order, and, as a result, entail a serious threat to the personal safety, physical and psychological integrity and protection of migrants. While focusing on longer term impacts of and responses to crises in countries of destination, origin and transit, the research will also investigate the availability of relevant mechanisms ensuring the protection of migrants before, during and after crisis in countries covered by the research. Six crises situations have been selected as case studies for in-depth research: Central African Republic (civil unrest 2014); Cote d'Ivorire (civil unrest 2000-2011); Lebanon (2006-today, impact on migrant domestic workers); Libya (civil unrest 2011); South Africa (xenophobic violence 2008-2015); Thailand (natural disaster 2011). The research is conducted as part of a wider project led by ICMPD supporting the global Migrants in Countries of Crisis Initiative. It is coordinated by the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) and is conducted in partnership the International Migration Institute (IMI) of Oxford University. In addition, local research partners are involved in the fieldwork and analysis for the case studies. The Research employs an interdisciplinary approach to assess the impact of crises on migrants in the countries under study. The research will combine secondary desk research and primary research in the field with relevant stakeholders, including migrants, policy makers and public officials, representatives of international organisations, civil society stakeholders and humanitarian organisations, diaspora organisations, academics and journalists, and employers and recruitment agencies Project Partners: International Migration Institute (IMI), University of Oxford
13 Project

Transnational Figurations of Displacement

Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
Objectives: The overall objective of the project is to develop solutions for protracted displacement situations (PDS) that are better tailored to the needs and capacities of persons affected by displacement. Current policies struggle to find solutions to forced displacement. Refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) are often stuck in ‘limbo’, i.e. living in situations of vulnerability, dependency and immobility, due to continuous cycles of displacement and a lack of durable options. The project will therefore aim at answering the questions whether and how PDS, dependency and vulnerability are related to the factors of connectivity and mobility. It will further look at how in turn, connectivity and mobility can be operationalized to enhance the self-reliance and resilience of displaced people. Summary: Protracted displacement situations are estimated to affect about 13 million individuals globally, approximately two-thirds of the 20 million refugees today. PDS affects both refugees who have left their countries of origin as well as internally displaced individuals subsisting in precarious living conditions and seeking stability and safety with no prospects of local integration, resettlement, or safe return. TRAFIG will conduct its research by analysing specific sites of exhibited protracted displacement situations throughout Asia, Africa and Europe in order to better understand the daily lives and challenges of those living in PDS, and to ultimately devise new and creative approaches for the alleviation of these problems. Moreover, TRAFIG seeks to explore the relationship between connectivity and mobility, and the realities of protracted displacement situations which increase vulnerability in order to understand how PDS can be challenged. ICMPD’s policy unit leads the stakeholder engagement and dialogue with policymakers and further seeks innovative options for the exploitation of results. In addition, the unit examines governance frameworks on displacement at the European and global level. Project Partners: BICC (Bonn International Center for Conversion), Addis Ababa University, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Danube University Krems, Dignity Kwanza – Community Solutions, FIERI (Forum of International and European Research on Immigration), ICMPD (International Centre for Migration Policy Development), SHARP (Society for Human Rights & Prisoners’ Aid), Universiteit Leiden, University of Sussex, Yarmouk University
14 Project

Promoting Comparative Quantitative Research in the Field of Migration and Integration in Europe

Year 2007
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
With the Amsterdam Treaty and the increasing competence of the European Union in the field of migration, integration, anti-discrimination and asylum, the need for comparative data in this area has been increasingly recognised. The project compiles meta-information on statistical datasets on migration, integration and discrimination in 29 European countries (EU27 plus Norway and Switzerland). It builds on the earlier COMPSTAT project carried out under the 5th Framework Programme between 2001-2002, the FP6 project "Towards harmonised European Statistics on International Migration" (THESIM), completed in 2005 as well as ongoing research within the IMISCOE network. Objectives • To improve the quality of publicly available information on migration, integration and discrimination responding thus to the needs of researchers, policy makers and practitioners for more reliable, more systematic and more harmonized statistical data • To enhance comparability of statistical data and understanding of indicators Outcomes • Launch of a comprehensive online database containing descriptions of datasets relevant to the study of migration. • Analyses of the national data collection system in 29 European countries. • Detailed analysis of the availability, comparability, and the usability of statistical data in 12 thematic areas: 1) general demographic data; 2) migration flows; 3) legal status of immigrants; 4) citizenship; 5) political participation; 6) employment; 7) income 8) housing; 9) irregular migration; 10) education; 11) family and 12) health as well as in two cross-cutting thematic fields - integration and discrimination
15 Project

Feasibility study on the labour market performance of regularised migrants in Europe

Year 2012
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
The regularisation of irregular immigrants remains one of the main controversial policy options in regard to policies towards irregular migrants. While there is an increasing realisation that in some contexts regularisation may be an appropriate and necessary response to the sustained presence of irregular migrants, notably in humanitarian cases such as migrants who cannot be returned or who have family or other strong ties to their country of residence, opposition against regularisation remains strong, often based on principled considerations. However, very little is still known about wider impacts of regularisation, and in particular the impact of regularisation on those regularised. Objectives: The objectives of this feasibility study are threefold: • To determine the feasibility of conducting a comparative survey on the labour market performance of regularised immigrants in seven European countries; • To identify the best design for an empirical study of the labour market performance of regularised and irregular migrants and prepare draft tools for an implementation of the survey; • To provide tentative results on labour market trajectories of regularised migrants on the basis of exploratory qualitative research conducted in the course of the feasibility study. An earlier study conducted by ICMPD between 2007 and 2009 ( “Regularisations in Europe”, REGINE) had identified the overall extent of regularisation, the different forms, rationales and target groups of regularisation, while linking regularisation to the complex causes of irregularity, differing patterns of irregular migration and different overall policy responses to irregular migration across the EU. Yet as a study largely based on desk research and limited primary data collection amongst public authorities and other stakeholders, the study was unable to provide robust evidence regarding the wider impacts of regularisation, including the impact of regularisation on labour market trajectories of regularised migrants. The REGANE study sets out to address this gap. In its feasibility study phase, the study has three aims. First, it will assess the feasibility of conducting a quantitative survey amongst regularised and non-regularised migrants in 7 European countries; second, it will explore the best design for a quantitative empirical study of labour market trajectories of regularised migrants; and third it will undertake explorative qualitative research involving research with relevant experts, public authorities and migrants, thus not only preparing the ground for the implementation of the quantitative survey but also providing preliminary results regarding labour market trajectories of regularised migrants. The quantitative survey prepared through this feasibility study itself is planned to be implemented in a second phase of the project. It expected to provide the first systematic comparative assessment of individual level impacts of regularisation on those regularised in Europe.
16 Project

CROSS-MIGRATION; systematic knowledge accumulation on migration

Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
CrossMigration supports the systematic accumulation of knowledge in migration studies. The Migration Research Hub, aims to be the go-to resource for finding knowledge on migration, from the latest literature to the most appropriate topical experts. The taxonomy of migration studies developed through this project allows everyone to identify opportunities for collaboration and new research projects across disciplines and geographies. The systematic approach to data collection and knowledge accumulation will promote and facilitate dialogue between researchers and policy stakeholders at the national and European level, and a clearer understanding of why and how migration occurs, who migrates and the effect of policy on these questions. The wealth of data gathered through the project will form the basis for developing a cross-national strategic research agenda for migration. And it will inform the public debate by allowing researchers to come up with theoretical scenarios that can be translated into interactive visualizations. The project, funded through Horizon 2020, began in March 2018. It is led by IMISCOE, a consortium of leading migration scholars at 15 institutions from across Europe, advised by a global network of researchers.
17 Project

Evaluation of the Common European Asylum System

Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
Abstract
Since 2015, migration to and within Europe has challenged the adequacy of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS). This has affected the implementation of both the CEAS and national asylum systems and called further harmonisation into question. Harmonisation is not a fixed term but incorporates varied meanings and practices. In legal terms, harmonisation has been explained as an approximation process towards minimum standards. In political terms, harmonisation focuses on policy convergence, of which legal harmonisation is only one of many mechanisms of convergence. CEASEVAL will determine what kind of harmonisation and solidarity is possible and necessary. CEASEVAL aims to: Carry out a comprehensive evaluation of the CEAS Analyse harmonisation going beyond formal institutions Consider actors engaged at local, national and European levels Explain the success and failure of coordinated action between these varied actors CEASEVAL has four objectives: Combine multiple disciplines in order to explore different perspectives of the CEAS Develop and test a new theoretical framework of multilevel governance of the CEAS Provide a critical evaluation of the CEAS by identifying and analysing discrepancies in the transposition and incorporation of European standards in the area of asylum in domestic legislation as well as differences in their implementation Elaborate new policies by considering different alternatives of implementing a common European asylum system http://ceaseval.eu/
18 Project
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